General Equipment
Equipment List


This section covers the wide variety of general gear available to adventurers of all sorts.

Many of the objects in this section are battery-operated. Any device that uses batteries comes with them. As a general rule, ignore battery life — assume that heroes (and their antagonists) are smart enough to recharge or replace their batteries between adventures, and that the batteries last as long as needed during adventures. If battery life is important in the game, roll 1d20 every time a battery-operated item is used. On a result of 1, the batteries are dead and the object is useless. New batteries have a cost of $10 and can be changed as a move action.


Adventuring Gear

Adventuring gear helps characters survive and function under unusual circumstances.

Aquaconverter: Developed by the Pride’s SciTech Division, the aquaconverter is a device that takes in water, separates its molecules into hydrogen and oxygen atoms, and then feeds the oxygen into a breather tube and the hydrogen into power-generating mechanisms.

Basic: Worn as a backpack with a breather tube placed in the mouth, the aquaconverter is a limitless and self-powering way to breathe safely underwater.
They are in use by all three HighBorn kingdoms.
Availability: June, 1986

Mini: Oshi has developed a miniaturized version of the aquaconverter which the user simply slips into his mouth. This mini-aquaconverter is used by Dramon, Replica, and the Great Empire.
Availability: December, Year -3

Binoculars: Binoculars are useful for watching opponents, wild game, and sporting events from a long distance.

Standard: Standard binoculars reduce the range penalty for vision-base Perception checks to –1 for every 50' (instead of –1 for every 10'). Using binoculars for Perception checks takes five times as long as making the check unaided.

Rangefinding: In addition to the benefit of standard binoculars, rangefinding binoculars include a digital readout that indicates the exact distance to the object on which they are focused.

Electro-Optical: Electro-optical binoculars function the same as standard binoculars in normal light. In darkness, however, users looking through them see as if they had the darkvision ability granted by night vision goggles (120' range).

Caltrops: Caltrops are four-pronged iron spikes designed so that one prong is pointing up when the caltrop rests on a surface. A character scatters caltrops on the ground to injure opponents, or at least slow them down. One bag of twenty-five caltrops covers a single 5' square. A Perception check (DC 15) is required to notice them. Each time a creature moves through a square containing caltrops at any rate greater than half speed, or each round a creature spends fighting in such an area, he makes a Reflex save (DC 15). Failure causes 1 point of damage, and the injury reduces foot speed to half normal (a successful Life Sciences or Nature check, DC 15, or one day’s rest removes this penalty). A charging or running creature must immediately stop if it steps on a caltrop. See the avoid hazard stunt for the effect of caltrops on vehicles.

Chemical Light Stick: This disposable plastic stick, when activated, uses a chemical reaction to create light for 6 hours. It brightly illuminates an area only 5' in radius, 10' for shadowy illumination. Once activated, it can’t be turned off or reused. The listed cost is for a pack of 5 sticks.

Climbing Gear: All of the tools and equipment that climbing enthusiasts use to make climbing easier and, in some cases, possible, including ropes, pulleys, helmet and pads, gloves, spikes, chocks, ascenders, pitons, a handax, and a harness. It takes 10 minutes to remove the gear from its pack and outfit it for use. Use this gear with the Athletics skill to climb.

Compass: A compass relies on the Earth’s magnetic field to determine the direction of magnetic north. A compass grants its user a +2 equipment bonus on Geography checks to navigate.

Disguise Kit: This kit contains everything needed to use the disguise function of the Bluff skill, including makeup, brushes, mirrors, wigs, and other accouterments. It doesn’t contain clothing or uniforms, however. Without this kit, you take a -4 to attempts to create a disguise.

Duct Putty: Developed by a dwarf plumper named Orvan Underpour, duct putty is a gray, malleable substance that comes in rectangular bars. When dry, it can be used as an adhesive to support up to 500 lbs. of weight indefinitely, or up to 750 lbs. for 1d6 rounds. Characters bound with duct putty must make a Strength or Escape Artist check (DC 25) to free themselves. It can also function as a bandage and a stain remover.
With water, it can be eaten. While it tastes like glue mixed with brown sugar, duct putty provides the consumer’s daily supply of nutrients and vitamins. Each bar is the equivalent of a single meal and is nutritious and filling.
Availability: March, 2002

Duct Tape: The usefulness of duct tape is limited only by a character’s imagination. Duct tape can support up to 200 lbs. indefinitely, or up to 300 lbs. for 1d6 rounds. Characters bound with duct tape must make a Strength or Escape Artist check (DC 20) to free themselves.
A roll provides 70', 2 inches wide.

EM Field Generator: Developed by Tinker, the Electro-Magnetic Field Generator (EMFiG) projects a personal EM field up to a 20' radius around a creature or object. The benefit of this device is two fold. First, it allows electronic devices equipped with this technology to function in areas with negligible or no electro-magnetic fields (such as some elemental planes or alien planets).
Originally used by Tinker, the EMFiG of the 1990s was a small device about the size of backpack. It was utilized by Pandora and Kevlar for some time before Flashbolt managed to miniaturize it to the size of a soda can.
Availability: July, 1993/March, Year 3

Fake ID: Purchasing a falsified driver’s license from a black market source can produce mixed results, depending on the skill of the forger. Typically, a forger has 1 to 4 ranks in the Artistry and Research skills, with a +1 ability modifier. When a character purchases a fake ID, the MI secretly makes a Research check for the forger (if needed), with a DC 10. The MI then makes a secret Artistry skill check which serves as the DC for the opposed check when someone inspects the fake ID. The cost of a fake ID is $100 + 25% for every rank the forger has in Artistry.

Fire Extinguisher: This portable apparatus uses a chemical spray to extinguish small fires. The typical fire extinguisher ejects enough extinguishing chemicals to put out a fire in a 10'x10' area as a move action. It contains enough material for two such uses. Recharging a fire extinguisher costs $20.

Flash Goggles: These eye coverings provide total protection against blinding light, but cause the wearer to take a -5 to vision-based Perception checks.

Flare Canister: Essentially a single-use flare gun, this device launches a signal flare.

Flare Rod: A flare rod is a fusee, like a road flare, about 9" long. It burns bright red for 30 minutes, illuminating a 30' radius.

Flashlight: Flashlights come in a wide variety of sizes and quality levels. Those covered here are professional, heavy-duty models, rugged enough to withstand the rigors of modern adventuring. Flashlights negate penalties for darkness within their illuminated areas.

Penlight: This small flashlight can be carried on a key ring. It projects a beam of light 10' long and 5' wide at its end.

Standard: This heavy metal flashlight projects a beam 30' long and 15' across at its end.

Battery Flood: Practically a hand-held spotlight, this item projects a bright beam 100' long and 50' across at its end.

Flexcable: Developed by the Hidden Kingdom, flexcable, sometimes called duracable, is as strong as steel, and as flexible and light as normal rope. Flexcable can replace most cables and ropes as a device for lifting, pulling, and support. Flexcable is made of a lightweight, durable synthetic fiber called flexon, wrapped hundreds of times in a swirl that reinforces itself as more stress is placed on the coil. Flexcable is able to support up to 10 tons of weight.
Availability: March, 1986

Fusion Disk: Developed by GnomeTech, this device is typically a small disk, about 1" in diameter, with a core of orichalcum. While there are more and less sophisticated variations, the most basic model has an "on/off" switch on its back side. Using molecular vibration technology, the face of the disk, made from orichalcum, can be fused to any solid surface on a molecular level. When "on", a fusion disk cannot be removed from a surface without breaking that surface.
Fusion disks are often used as rivets, tethers, or to aid climbing.

Gas Mask: This apparatus covers the face and connects to a chemical air filter canister to protect the lungs and eyes from toxic gases. It provides total protection from eye and lung irritants. The filter canister lasts for 12 hours of use. Changing a filter is a move action. The cost for one extra filter canister is $40.

Glass Cutter: This tool is used for cutting glass panes. Its often tipped with diamond or some harder substance. Those used by buglers often have a suction cup and a swivel arm.

Grappling Hook: A grappling hook can be affixed to a rope or similar item and thrown to secure one end of the line for climbing. Throwing a grappling hook successfully requires a Rope Use check (DC 10, +2 per 10' of distance thrown).

Graptag: Developed by the Hidden Kingdom (based on Tinker's jam-bond), and often used in conjunction with flexcable, the graptag (often called a grap) is a small disc roughly 2" in diameter. When placed against a solid surface, the grappler tag molecularly binds to it. The grap can then be attached to rope or flexcable and be used as an anchor for climbing, pulling, or any other purpose. A button on the top of the disc releases the graptag’s hold.
Availability: March, Year -1

Hackcard: Developed by multiple sources and perfected by the Hidden Kingdom’s Sci-Tech division for use by the Network, the hackcard is a disposable, one-use item designed to allow those who are not computer savvy to bypass technological barriers or perform computer-related tasks. Each hackcard is an individual data-carrying card roughly the size of a credit card. It has a hole in its center, a magnetic strip on one side, and a flat port where a USB can be attached. Each hackcard carries a program designed for a single purpose; this may be to open doors, bypass security restrictions, crash a computer, or even to modify information. Almost any task that can be performed by using the Computer Use skill can be encoded into a hackcard, as can any computerized uses of the Disable Device skill. Hackcards can be swiped in magnetic keycard readers, be inserted into disc drives, or plugged into a USB port with virtually the same ease.
When a character uses a hackcard for its designated purpose, the hackcard’s Computer Use or Disable Device bonus (+15) is used in the place of the character’s. After a single use, the card disintegrates, using early teleportation technology, leaving behind no trace of tampering.
Hackcards are in use by most Penumbrite organizations.
Availability: September, Year -1

Handcuffs: Handcuffs are restraints designed to lock two limbs—normally the wrists—of a prisoner together. They fit any Medium-size or Small human or other creature that has an appropriate body structure.

Steel: These heavy-duty cuffs have hardness 10, 10 hit points, a break DC of 30, and require a Escape Artist check (DC 35) or Mechanics check (DC 25) to remove without the key.

Zip-Tie: These are single-use disposable handcuffs, much like heavy-duty cable ties. They have hardness 0, 4 hit points, and a break DC of 25. They can only be removed by cutting them off (Escape Artist and Mechanics checks automatically fail). The listed price is for a bag of 500.

Jam-Bond: Developed by Tinker, based on GnomeTech's fusion disk technology, a jam-bond appears similar to a roll of red-gold tape (orichalcum). When in place, it molecularly binds a door or similar portal to its frame, granting a +10 to the portal's break DC. The jam-bond can be disengaged with an electronic key as a standard electronic lock.
Availability: June, 1989

Jetpack: Developed by many sources for many functions over the past few decades, this technology was perfected by Nathaniel Quinn for the Protectorate. A jetpack consists of a backpack and fuel cells capable of producing powered flight for up to 2 hours. A character equipped with a jetpack can fly at a speed of 60' (poor maneuverability). Replacement fuel cells cost $120.
Availability: March, 1987

Laser Fire-Starter: This device is a 3" tube that looks much like a flashlight or laser-pointer. When activated, it produces a visible beam of heat capable of igniting flammable materials. Its continuous beam can deal 1d6 fire damage per round.
Availability: November, Year -1

Lockpicks: Lockpicks are tools for disabling and bypassing mechanical locking mechanisms.

Car Opening Kit: This set of odd-shaped flat metal bars can be slipped into the window seam of a car door to trip the lock. The DC of a Mechanics check to accomplish this varies with the quality of the lock; see the skill description.

Lockpick Set: A lockpick set includes picks and tension bars for opening locks operated by standard keys. A lockpick set allows a character to make Mechanics checks to open mechanical locks (deadbolts, keyed entry locks, and so forth) without penalty.

Lock Release Gun: This small, pistollike device automatically disables cheap and average mechanical locks operated by standard keys (no Mechanics check necessary).

Laser Tripwire: The laser tripwire is a simple device that replaces the standard physical tripwire. A single focused beam of light is projected out from the tripwire generator until it hits a solid surface. If the beam is broken by, for example, a person passing through the beam, the tripwire generator immediately sends out a signal from its data port. This can be used to activate an alarm, trigger an explosive device, or even just turn on the lights in a particular room, depending on what event the signal is set to trigger.
Availability: June, 1982

Magnesium Fire-Starter: This thin block of magnesium is only an inch wide and two inches long with a flint running along the top edge. A knife is used to shave bits of the magnesium from the block and then used to create sparks from the flint, allowing a fire to be started with relative ease in almost any conditions. Starting a fire with a magnesium fire starter doesn't typically require a check. If the MI deems the conditions difficult to start a fire (typically calling for a Nature or Physical Sciences check), this item grants a +5 bonus to that check.

Map: While a compass or GPS receiver can help characters find their way through the wilderness, a map can tell a character where he or she is going and what to expect when he or she gets there.

Road Atlas: Road atlases are available for nearly every country in the world, showing all major roads in each state, province, or nation in a region. They can also be purchased for most major metropolitan areas, detailing every street in the entire region.

Shadow Map: A shadow map covers a region—usually a city, possible an expanse of wild lands, or even a system of tunnels or caverns. It marks secret areas of interest to Penumbrites, such as hunting grounds of werewolf packs, gateways into the fey realms, or entrances to downs. Building, or clusters of them, are marked, as are passages, roads, and entrances. They also, when appropriate, are marked with warnings of dangers, such as monster territories and hazards. Shadow maps are not available for all areas. They usually have to be purchased from local cartographers on the Bronze Market. Safe areas without local monsters or deadly hazards cost $10 (80% chance it can be purchased on the shadoweb as PDFs or delivered in 5 days). Maps of dangerous areas cost the highest Encounter Level in the area x $20 (30% -1 per the highers Encounter Level chance it can be purchased on the shadoweb as PDFs or delivered in 5 days). Shadow maps that are considered valuable can cost anywhere from $100 and up (10% chance it can be purchased on the shadoweb as PDFs or delivered in 5 days).

Tactical Map: A tactical map covers a small area—usually a few miles on a side—in exacting detail. Generally, every building is represented, along with all roads, trails, and areas of vegetation. Tactical maps are not available for all areas, and, though inexpensive, they generally have to be ordered from federal mapping agencies (taking a week or longer to obtain).

Mesh Vest: This is a lightweight vest with a series of pockets for items such as a compass, spare ammunition magazines, pressure bandages, and a radio, along with loops for attaching grenades, knives, or tools. It can hold up to 40 pounds of equipment.
A mesh vest provides a +2 equipment bonus to Strength for the purpose of determining carrying capacity.

Multipurpose Tool: This device contains several different screwdrivers, a knife blade or two, can opener, bottle opener, file, short ruler, scissors, tweezers, and wire cutters. The whole thing unfolds into a handy pair of pliers. A multipurpose tool can lessen the penalty for making Architecture, Electronics, and Mechanics checks without appropriate tools to –2 instead of the normal –4. The tool is useful for certain tasks, as determined by the MI, but may not be useful in all situations.

Neural Scrambler: Developed by MindSmith, the neural scrambler is a restraint device used by Penumbrite law enforcement agencies in the place of physical restraints such as handcuffs. The neural scrambler consists of a six-pronged device that, when placed over the head, interrupts brainwave activity. A character wearing a neural scrambler may not take any actions whatsoever, though she moves her normal speed under the command of another individual. When the neural scrambler is removed, the character has no knowledge of events that took place while she was restrained.
Availability: May, 1976

Night Vision Goggles: Night vision goggles use passive light gathering to improve vision in near-dark conditions. They grant the user darkvision with a range of 120', but because of the restricted field of view and lack of depth perception these goggles provide, they impose a –4 penalty on all vision-based Perception checks made by someone wearing them.
Night vision goggles must have at least a little light to operate. A cloudy night provides sufficient ambient light, but a pitch-black cave or a sealed room doesn’t. For situations of total darkness, the goggles come with an infrared illuminator that, when switched on, operates like a standard flashlight whose light is visible only to the wearer (or anyone else wearing night vision goggles).

Pass: A pass is simply an identification card. In addition to printed information, modern passes have an embedded microchip that allows members of certain organizations access to restricted areas or information for which they have clearance. Advanced models (such as the HKPass and DoSHA Pass) incorporate a nanobeacon. The pass includes a photo ID, a list of the character’s name, codename, affiliation, and clearance, and basic information about the individual (such as clearance and medical specifications) in the microchip. Passes are encrypted and very difficult to fake (+10 to DC’s against Computers checks to read without the proper reader).
The Restriction on a pass depends on the type of pass and the clearance it allows. Most passes have a restriction of Military.
Along with several government and private organizations, the Three Kingdoms all utilize this technology, as does DoSHA.

Pocket Knife: This small utility knife has a 4" blade that folds into the handle. It isn't a very effective weapon, dealing 1d3 damage, plus the wielder's Strength modifier.

Portable Environment Generator: Developed by the Hidden Kingdom’s Sci-Tech division, the portable environment generator (PEnGen) is an important piece of survival gear that can be taken on almost any expedition. It’s a cylinder roughly two feet in height, the PEnGen can project a 30' sphere of custom environment under any conditions. In cold weather areas, the generator produces heat. In arid deserts, the generator produces both cool air and moisture.
At night, the generator acts as a glow lamp and provides the area with light. Thanks to a special energy bubble produced by the generator, any atmospheric changes stay within the 30' radius and do not escape until the device is deactivated. Essentially, the portable environment generator can produce a sphere inside which a group of people can be relatively comfortable despite extremely harsh conditions outside the generator’s influence.
Availability: March, Year -2

Portable Glow Lamp
The portable glow lamp can function as a directional lighting device (like a flashlight) or as an area-covering lantern. Glow lamps have long-lasting power cells and bulbs that never need to be replaced, and can be adjusted to provide light in any radius up 60'.

Portable Stove: This small stove works on kerosene or white gasoline, and can easily be broken down and carried for backpacking.

Puritizer: Developed by Tinker, the puritizer is a small, semitransparent cylinder roughly one foot tall that removes impurities from water and food. The puritizer’s onboard computer recognizes chemicals that can be harmful to the human body and separates them from the food and drink.

Rebreather: A rebreather, or "CCUBA" (Closed Circuit Underwater Breathing Apparatus), is a breathing set that uses recycled exhaled gas mixed with oxygen. This makes the rebreather lighter and more compact than traditional open-circuit breathing set.

Rope: Climbing rope can support up to 1,000 pounds.

Scuba Tank: SCUBA was originally an acronym for Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus. It is a set of gear used for breathing under water, the most common being the "open-circuit". The wearer breathes in from the equipment and all the exhaled gas goes to waste in the surrounding water. This type of equipment is relatively simple, making it cheaper and more reliable than a rebreather.

Scuba Suit: A set of scuba gear includes a snorkel, a wet suit, a Buoyancy Control Device (BCD), swimfins, a depth gauge, a diving watch, and a dive mask.

Search-and-Rescue Kit: This waist pack contains a first aid kit, a compass, waterproof matches, a lightweight “space” blanket, a standard flashlight, 50' of durable nylon rope, two smoke grenades, and one signal flare.

Sleeping Bag: This lightweight sleeping bag rolls up compactly. It can keep a character warm even in severe weather and can also double as a stretcher in an emergency.

Spike Strip: This device is designed to help the police end car chases. The strip comes rolled in a spool about the size of a small suitcase. Deploy it by rolling it across a roadway, where it lies like a flat, segmented belt. (The user can roll it out onto the road without entering the lane of traffic.) Until the strip is activated, the spikes do not protrude, and cars can pass safely over it. When the user activates it (via a control device attached to the end of the strip by a 10'-long cord), the spikes extend.
Each time a creature moves through a square containing an activated spike strip at any rate greater than half speed, or each round a creature spends fighting in such an area, the spike strip makes a touch attack roll (base attack bonus +0). The strip deals 2 points of damage on a successful hit, and the injury reduces foot speed to half normal (a successful Treat Injury check, DC 15, or one day’s rest removes this penalty). Wheeled vehicles passing over the strip are automatically hit—although vehicles equipped with puncture-resistant tires are not affected.

Swing-Line: Originally developed by the Hidden Kingdom, swing lines have come in a wide variety over the years. Essentially, they are ropes or cables fired at a solid surface with some sort of anchor. They allow a character to swing from one location to another within 100' or less.
Modern swing lines include features such as A/D (ascension/descension) modules adding a +2 equipment bonus to Dexterity checks used to accurately swing. They line is generally a monofilament rope and the carbon steel spike anchor, fired from a pistol-like weapon with a range increment of 30' (usually hitting a 5' square) and a motorized reel. It has a maximum range of 100'.
Characters with the Super-Dexterity upgrade Swinging can use these devices to greater effect than most.

Tether-Gun: The Hidden Kingdom issues a version called the tether-gun, with interchangeable anchors which include the spike, a graptag, a grappling hook, and a bola. The line itself is flexcable. This version has a 150' range.
Availability: September, Year -1

Tent: A tent keeps a character warm and dry in severe weather, providing a +2 equipment bonus on Fortitude saves against the effects of cold weather.

Trail Rations: Trail rations come in a number of commercial options. They all provide the necessary energy and nutrition for survival. The cost given is for a case of 12 meals.


Communications Equipment

Communications equipment is vital for coordinating efforts and transferring information. It can also be used to augment many Charisma-based abilities such as the Inspire 1 or Leadership 1 talents.
Rules for operating computers appear under the Computers skill. Some of the items in this section have monthly subscription costs (possibly covered under Budget Options) as well as initial purchase costs. The cost accounts for only the initial price of the equipment.

Atomicom: Developed by Shepherd, the Atomicom is a hand-held communication device used by the members of Atomic Youth and several of there associates. It looks like and works as a cell phone. It allows ultra-secure communications between multiple users, including “all calls” (when a single user wishes to send an alert with an audio message). The central section flips open to reveal a small keyboard and LCD monitor for internet access and video communication. The interface is not as easy to use as a standard computer, so characters suffer a -4 penalty to Computers and Research checks when using this device, and such actions always take twice the standard time to complete. A secondary interface can negate this penalty.
It is also linked in to Merlin, Atomic Youth’s central computer, allowing research checks associated with Knowledge (Arcane Lore) on topics of HighBorn and other Penumbrites.
They come with basic software and 3 additional program slots (Added Memory can boost this number to 6 program slots).
Each is also equipped with a GPS, letting the user know where he is on the planet at any given time. The Atomicom can take digital pictures and store up to 40 images. Ringtones can be fully personalized, the standard “bee-da-beep” being the default.
Atomicoms are weather resistant and waterproof, gaining a +4 to any necessary saves.
An Atomicom must be recharged every 48 hours, taking 20 minutes.
Shepherd distributes these with a charger and earpiece. The earpiece connects wirelessly to the Atomicom allowing the communications features to be used hands free.
Atomicoms are used by the Atomic Youth and the Council of the Wise. They are provided to members of these groups free of charge (value: $600).
Availability: January, Year 1

Badge-Comm: Developed by the Hidden Kingdom’s Sci-Tech division, the Badge-Comm is a small communications device worn attached to the uniform of an agent of the Hidden Kingdom. They vary in appearance based on the branch of service. It allows verbal communication from one wearer to another within a five-mile range. When interfaced with a dispatcher, the device is granted an virtually unlimited range, but the dispatcher must be contacted in order for the agents to be linked. These digital communicators are highly secure. Each is equipped with a GPS, letting the dispatcher know where he is at all times. The badge-comm can utilize a wireless earpiece, often employed in the field, allowing quieter communications.
Badge-Comms are weather resistant and waterproof, gaining a +4 to any necessary saves.
A Badge-Comm must be recharged every 72 hours, taking 20 minutes.
Omega Force, while on their own, uses a modified version of this device with its own dispatcher.
Badge-comms are used by the Hidden Kingdom, DoSHA, and Omega Force. They are provided to members of these groups free of charge (value: $200).
Availability: February, Year 0

Cell Phone: A cell phone is a basic, digital communications device used for mobile voice or data communication. In addition to the standard voice function, cell phones support text messaging, as well as taking, sending, and receiving photos and video. A cell phone uses a battery that lasts for 24 hours before it must be recharged (20 minutes). It works in any area covered by cellular service.

Com: Developed by Tinker for the Hidden Kingdom, the com is an all-in-one piece of equipment that handles the communication needs of a single person. Each com has its own frequency and can send transmissions both directly to another individual com as well as to an entire group of coms. The com also has a data port so that it can be linked to a computer system and receive data as well as audio and visual communications, as well as functions similar to a smartphone.
A com must be recharged every 48 hours, taking 20 minutes.
The interface is not as easy to use as a standard computer, so characters with no ranks in Computers suffer a -4 penalty to Computers and Research checks when using this device, and such actions always take twice the standard time to complete. A secondary interface can negate this penalty.
They come with basic software and 2 additional program slot (Added Memory can boost this number to 4 program slots).
Coms are weather resistant and waterproof, gaining a +2 to any necessary saves.
The precursor to the Atomicom and Badge-Comm (which are both often simply called "coms"), the com is still in use by the Great Empire (though theirs is significantly miniaturized), the Pride, the Hunt, the Horde, the Ettore, most shadow mercenaries, and many other Penumbrites.
Availability: June, 1988

Com-Array: A com-array is computerized piece of equipment that functions as a relay station for coms, a switchboard, and a audio/video communicator. It has advanced audio and hi-resolution video capabilities. Coms require a com-array to function. This isn't generally an issue, as there are several broad options. GTC (a subsidiary of GnomeTech) has provided affordable com coverage for 20 years using a massive network of com-arrays. In recent years, the Hidden Kingdom, the Great Empire, and the Pride have provided their citizens with com service. These com services do the trick, and allow characters to utilize a basic com, but they might have less than impregnable security. Having a personal com-array, like many teams of heroes and villains do, allows for the creation of secured lines and other security features, mostly due to the significantly small network.
To eaves-drop on a com to com communication, the hacker must know the network's line-code. This information can be obtained from a com or com-array attuned to that network by making a Computers check (DC 10). Once this information is obtained, tapping into com devices on that network requires a Computers check. The DC is determined by the network's security and the number of users on the network.
Security by Network Size

Users DC
1-2 40
3-6 35
7-12 30
13-50 25
51-200 20
201+ 15

Security Modifiers

Level of Security DC
Minimum +0
Average +5
Exceptional +10
Maximum +20

Availability: February, 1989

Com-bead: Originally developed by the CIA, the com-bead is a tiny earpiece that transmits incoming communications directly into the ear, at a volume far too low to allow others to hear. It has a short range, directional microphone which allows the user to broadcast while speaking no louder than a whisper. A com-bead has a range of 2 miles, but can be encoded to any communication device with wireless capabilities or utilize a relay station.
Using a com-bead does not provoke a normal Perception check to be heard by others and cannot be heard by any normal means. A Perception check (DC 20) can reveal a com-bead to an onlooker who is looking for it.
Availability: July, 2001

ComSat Network: Private communications satellites (comsats) allow characters to communicate over highly secure channels. However, a single satellite is limited in the area that it can cover. Therefore, for full effect, a constellation of satellites is required. GnomeTech and the Three Kingdoms have such networks in place and allow access to them by privately owned com-arrays. However, having your own network of comsats grants a +10 to your communications network's security.
Availability: February, 1989

Portable Satellite Telephone: This object looks much like a bulky cell phone, and functions in much the same way as well. However, because it communicates directly via satellite, it can be used anywhere on earth, even in remote areas well beyond the extent of cell phone service.
Portable satellite phones are very expensive to use. When used in a place not served by regular cellular service, each call costs $10 x (1d4+2).

Smartphone: A smartphone is a hybrid of the standard cell phone and a PDA, granting advanced features like e-mail and Internet capabilities. A smartphone uses a battery that lasts for 24 hours before it must be recharged. It works in any area covered by cellular service.
A com must be recharged every 24 hours, taking 20 minutes.
The interface is not as easy to use as a standard computer, so characters with no ranks in Computers suffer a -4 penalty to Computers and Research checks when using this device, and such actions always take twice the standard time to complete. A secondary interface can negate this penalty.
They come with basic software and 2 additional program slots (Added Memory can boost this number to 4 program slots).

Wireless Headset: This device attaches to the users ear allowing him hands-free use of his cell phone or com.

Walkie-Talkie: This hand-held radio transceiver communicates with any similar device operating on the same frequency and within range.

Basic: This low-end variety has only a few channels. Anyone else using a similar walkie-talkie within range can listen in on the character’s conversations. It has a range of 2 miles.

Professional: This high-end civilian model allows a character to program in twenty different frequencies from thousands of choices—making it likely that the character can find a frequency that’s not being used by anyone else within range. The device can be used with or without a voice-activated headset (included). It has a range of 15 miles.

Computers

Whether a desktop or laptop model, a computer includes a keyboard, a mouse, a monitor, speakers, a CD-ROM drive, a DSL modem, and the latest processor. A character needs a computer to make Computers checks and to make Research checks involving the internet.

Desktop: Bulky but powerful, these machines are common on desks everywhere. They come with basic software and 10 additional program slots (Added Memory can boost this number to 20 program slots).

Laptop: Lightweight and portable, laptop computers have most of the functions available on desktop computers. They come with basic software and 5 additional program slots (Added Memory can boost this number to 10 program slots).

Notebook: Slim and super-lightweight, a notebook computer is smaller and more easily portable than a laptop, but with less functionality. Notebook computers don't have CD drives. They come with basic software and 3 additional program slots (Added Memory can boost this number to 6 program slots).

PDA: Personal data assistants are handy tools for storing data. They also serve as cell phones, web browsers, and portable media players. They can access the Internet, intranets or extranets via Wi-Fi, or Wireless Wide-Area Networks (WWANs). Many PDAs employ touch screen technology. They can be linked to a notebook or desktop computer to move files back and forth, and can be used for Computers or Research checks, but take a -4 penalty to these skill checks and double the normal time. A secondary interface can negate this penalty.
They come with basic software and 2 additional program slots (Added Memory can boost this number to 4 program slots).

Super Computer: A fixed object, the super computer is utilized in laboratories, technology companies, and super hero headquarters. They come with basic software and 20 additional program slots (Added Memory can boost this number to 40 program slots).

System Upgrades

You can use a stock computer right out of the box, but for those who depend on them upgrading systems is nearly a necessity.

Upgrade Functionality: A character can upgrade a desktop or laptop computer’s processor to provide a +1 equipment bonus on Computers checks. Increase the cost of a desktop by 50%, a laptop or notebook by 100%, or a com or similar device by 150% to purchase 1 upgrade. You can also pay the difference to upgrade the functionality of a computer.

Upgrade Memory: By adding memory to a computer, you allow it to hold more programs. Each application of memory allows an additional 2 program slots, up to double the initial space available on the computer. For each application of this

Upgrade Speed: By adding processing speed to a computer, you allow it to complete tasks faster. Each application of processing speed allows reduces the time it takes to complete a task by 10% (rounded down). A computers speed cannot be reduced to less than 30%.

Computer Accessories

Computers can utilize many different accessories, including microphones, head-sets, and wireless mice. Here are some common accessories.

Modem: A modem allows a character to connect a computer to the Internet. To use a modem, a character must have a computer and an appropriate data line (or a cell phone, in the case of a cellular modem).
All computers come with wireless broadband modems. Old computers may only have a DSL broadband or even dial-up modem, which uses a standard telephone line; while it’s connected, that telephone line can’t be used for another purpose. Research checks using a dial-up modem take 5 times the indicated time. Computers checks still take the listed time.

Broadband: These come standard on modern computers, but prices are listed for the purpose of replacements and upgrades. Cable modems and DSL services bring high-speed Internet access into the homes of millions. A broadband modem gives a character on-demand, high-speed access to data, allowing Research checks involving the Internet to be made in half the normal time. Computers checks still take the listed time.

Cellular: A cellular modem allows a character to connect her laptop computer or PDA to the Internet anywhere he can use a cell phone. However, access speed is slow, and any Computers or Research check involving the Internet takes the listed time.

Mastercraft: Mastercraft modems are simply high-end modems. The mastercraft bonus increases the speed of the internet connection. For every bonus, shave 10% off the indicated time to perform a Research check.
The cost for a mastercraft modem costs 200% the listed price for a +1 modem, 400% the listed price for a +2 modem, and so on. The highest mastercraft bonus available is +5.

Printer: The color inkjet printer described here is suited for creating hard copies of text and image files from computers.

Scanner: A color flatbed scanner allows the user to transfer images and documents from hard copy into a computer in digital form.

Software: Computers come with a great deal of basic software, including the operating system, virus protection, word processors suites, media players, and internet browsers. Additional, specialized software may be purchased as well. Every computer has a maximum number of these additional programs that may be downloaded onto its memory. Most programs grant a bonus to a skill check, or to multiple skill checks in limited situations. A program can grant a higher than +2 bonus, but the price is higher and the program takes up more space.
Computers rely on memory. All computers come with basic software and a number of additional program slots. Added Memory can boost this number to twice the listed capacity. A program takes up memory. While a simple program takes up negligible memory, sophisticated programs can take 1 or more slots. The more advanced a program is, the more slots it takes. If a program is to big for a computer, that program cannot be downloaded successfully.

Program Skill bonus Cost Time Memory Used
Basic +2 Base Cost Listed Listed
Deluxe +3 Base Cost x2 3/4 +1 slots
Advanced +4 Base Cost x3 1/2 +2 slots
Cutting Edge +5 Base Cost x4 1/4 +3 slots

It is possible to delete some of the basic software a computer uses. The operating system can be replaced, but doesn't free any slots. Removing virus protection, word processors suites, media players, and internet browsers each free 1 slot that can be filled with a new program.

Animation Software: This software package can be used with the Artistry and Design skills to create animated videos. This is not the software that allows for realistic CGI animation, but it is capable of rendering 3D images. Use of this software requires you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Animation software doesn't grant a bonus to skill checks, but higher quality programs may reduce the time or offer more realistic animation. Deluxe software allows for professional cartoon quality. Advanced software allows for professional 3D or feature film animation quality. Cutting Edge software allows for life-like animation quality. Time required is 1d4 hours for 30 minutes of film for basic, 1d4 hours for 20 minutes of film for deluxe, 1d4 hours for 10 minutes of film for advanced, and 1d4 hours for 5 minutes of film for cutting edge.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 2

Anti-Security Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Computers skill checks that involve defeating computer security if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Arcana Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Arcane Lore skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 1d4 minutes to run basic functions and 1d2 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Architecture Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Architecture skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time to make such items.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Chemistry Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Chemistry skill checks that don't involve demolitions or pharmaceuticals and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time to make such substances (minimum 1 round).
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Civics Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Civics skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 1d4 minutes to run basic functions and 1d2 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Simple.
Program Slots: 0

Cryptography Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Decipher skill checks that involve cryptography (code breaking) if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It takes 30 seconds to decipher a single page of text.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Database, Empty: A database is a collection of searchable and organizable statistics and information. It could be devoted to baseball players and teams, cities and nations, or super-villains, among many other topics. Databases are built by compiling information into a database program. This requires a Research check (DC 15) and 1d4 hours of work. Once complete, Research checks on the given topic require only 1d4 minutes. Databases require continued upkeep as new information is obtained. Databases do not offer bonuses to skill checks.
Program Type: Simple.
Program Slots: 1 (0 when empty)

Database, Full: This is a completed database. The research and compiling of information has already been done. It allows Research checks on the given topic to be completed in only 1d4 minutes. Databases require continued upkeep as new information is obtained. Databases do not offer bonuses to skill checks.
Wile listed at $150, the MI may deem that databases on certain topics are more expensive, and that they contain restricted information, particularly those involving the Penumbra.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Degrade Programming Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Computers checks to degrade programs, including writing viruses, if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers.

Demolitions Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Architecture, Chemistry. Electronics, Mechanics skill checks that involve demolitions if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time to make or defuse such items. It takes 1d2 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Design Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Design skill checks that don't involve demolitions or pharmaceuticals if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time needed to design an object.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Diagnostics Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Computers skill checks that involve repairing computers and computerized devices if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time normally required to perform such a task.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Disguise Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Bluff skill checks to create a disguise if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time normally required to create a disguise.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Digital Art Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Artistry and Design skill checks when creating art in a digital format if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time normally required to create such a work.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 2

Electronics Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Electronics skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also reduces the time to make electronic devices by 1 hour.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

File Search Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Computers skill checks made to find files, data, or programs on an unfamiliar computer system if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time normally required to perform such a task (minimum 1 round).
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 0

Finances Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Finances skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It takes 1d4 minutes to run basic functions and 1d2 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Forensics Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to Forensics skill checks made to examine evidence if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Forgery Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to Artistry, Computers, and Design skill checks made to create a forged document, if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

History Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all History skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It takes 1d4 minutes to make these research checks.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Life Sciences Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Life Science skill checks except for those made to treat injuries and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It takes 1d4 minutes to make this skill check.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Linguistics Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to Decipher skill checks that deal with written languages (not codes) if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. The program can identify and help translate the tongue with a successful Decipher skill check as a full-round action.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Mapping Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to Geography skill checks and related Research checks that deal with maps, locations, and directions. It also halves the time required.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Mechanics Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Mechanics skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also reduces the time to make mechanical devices by one hour.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Medical Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Life Science skill checks made to treat injuries if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also reduces the time to make mechanical devices by half (minimum 1 round).
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 2

Nature Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Nature skill checks except those to treat injury and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It takes 1d4 minutes to run basic functions and 1d2 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Penumbra Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Penumbra Lore skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 1d4 minutes to Research using this program.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Pharmacist Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Chemistry skill checks that involve pharmaceuticals and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time to make such substances (minimum 1 round).
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Photography Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Artistry and Perception skill checks that involve photographs if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also halves the time to make such checks (minimum 1 round).
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Physical Sciences Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Physical Sciences skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 1d4 minutes.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Planar Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Planar Lore skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 2d4 minutes to run basic functions and 1d4 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Programming Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to Computers checks made to create simple and sophisticated programs, if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also reduces the time needed by 1 hour (minimum 30 minutes).
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Psionic Lore Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Psionic Lore skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 1d4 minutes to run basic functions and 1d2 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Remote Device Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Computers checks to operate remote devices, if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers.

Security Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to Computers checks made to protect your computer from being accessed by others, either directly or through the modem, creating computer security, and defending computer security, if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. The program runs with a Computers skill of 15 and takes 10 (total Computers check of 25). This means that your computer has average security (DC 25 to be hacked), and does not modify the DC for Remote Device checks. Unless the hacker succeeds at each Computers check by 5 or more, the computer detects him and alerts you. If you actively fight the hacker off, you add +2 to your Computers skill opposed by the hacker's, if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. If successful, you lock the hacker out. He may try again, but you gain a +2 Computers check to detect him. If you succeed by 5 or more, you have located the hacker's computer.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Shadoweb Access: You have access to the shadoweb. This does not grant a bonus to skill checks, and cannot be upgraded.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Tactics Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Tactics skill checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 2d4 minutes to run basic functions and 1d4 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Text Translation Software: This software package translates common Earth text at a rate of 30 seconds per page. It can be upgraded with alien and extraplanar languages, each counting as a deluxe (alien or extraplanar) or advanced (alien and extraplanar) program, but this does not reduce the time needed to translate texts. This program translates written text only.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 2

Theology and Philosophy Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Theology and Philosophy skill checks and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 2d4 minutes to run basic functions.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Track Covering Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Computers skill checks made to cover your tracks when hacking if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. It also reduces the chance of a computer alerting its administrator to your activities by 2. Thus, if when trying to defeat security on a computer, you can fail by 5 or 6 without the computer alerting the administrator. Failure by 7 or more still lets them know you're their.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 0

Writing Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Writing skill checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is halved.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Zoology Software: This software package grants a +2 bonus to all Animals skill checks, except for those involving riding, and related Research checks if you have 5 or more ranks in Computers. Time required is 1d4 minutes to run basic functions and 1d2 hours to run full simulations.
Program Type: Sophisticated.
Program Slots: 1

Displays

Display Glasses: Developed by the Ettore, this logical advancement of video display and VR technology, display glasses provide on-the-go monitors that can be hooked up to everything from computer systems to televisions and other audio/video equipment. Each pair of display glasses looks like a darkened pair of sunglasses and features one or two earpieces that wrap around the back of the ear. The glasses are semitransparent and allow the wearer to see both the display and the user’s surroundings simultaneously.
Availability: September, Year -1

Heads-Up Display (HUD): A heads-up display (also known as a head-up display or HUD) is any type of display that presents data without blocking the user's view. This technique was pioneered for military aviation and is now used in commercial aviation, motor vehicle and other applications. It’s one of the most valuable innovations in portable information technology. A HUD is composed of optical sensors for taking in data and a display device that projects an overlay in the user’s field of vision. A HUD also typically incorporates some sort of communications link or data link to allow another person or computer to see what the wearer sees and transmit valuable information back to the HUD. A HUD may be fixed (such as a windshield) or mounted (such as a helmet).
Additionally, a person with a link to the HUD can freely send data and images to the wearer at any time. Individual software packages (represented as gadgets) can further augment the abilities of a HUD.

HUD, Advanced: Developed by the Great Empire, an advanced HUD functions identically to a standard heads-up display, presenting data without blocking the user's view. It's usually a headband fitted with optical sensors for taking in data and an eyepiece display device that projects an overlay in the user’s field of vision. It incorporates a communicator and data link to allow another person or computer to see what the wearer sees and transmit valuable information back to the HUD.
Additionally, a person with a link to the HUD can freely send data and images to the wearer at any time. Individual software packages (represented as gadgets) can further augment the abilities of a HUD.
Availability: March, Year -2

Recording Equipment

Recording a moment in time can be important during investigations and just for fun. There are numerous items that allow you to record audio and video.

Camera: Still cameras let a character capture a record of what he or she has seen. A camera is needed to use the photography aspect of the Artistry skill.

35mm Camera: This camera can accept different lenses and takes high-quality pictures. The film used in a camera must be developed.

Digital, Basic: A digital camera uses no film; instead, its pictures are simply downloaded to a computer as image files. No film developing is necessary. This model takes standard pictures, but isn't suited for artistry or high-resolution.

Digital, Professional: A digital camera uses no film; instead, its pictures are simply downloaded to a computer as image files. No film developing is necessary. This model takes high-quality, high-resolution, professional pictures.

Disposable: A 35mm camera with film built in can be purchased from vending machines, tourist traps, drugstores, and hundreds of other places. Once the film is used, the entire camera is turned in to have the film developed.

Film: The medium upon which photographs are stored, film comes in a variety of sizes and speeds. The cost represents the cost of a roll of 24 exposures of high-speed (ASA 400) film.

Developing: In most areas, drugstores and photo shops provide 1-hour service; in others, it takes 24 hours. In really remote areas, film may have to be sent away for developing, taking a week or longer. The cost represents the cost of getting two prints of each shot on a roll of film, or one of each and any two also blown up to a larger size.

Digital Audio Recorder: These tiny recorders (about the size of a deck of playing cards) can record up to eight hours of audio and can be connected to a computer to download the digital recording. Digital audio recorders don’t have extremely sensitive microphones; they only pick up sounds within 10'.

Portable Video Camera: Portable video camera records up to 60 minutes of video digitally. This can be downloaded to a computer or played back on the eyepiece.

Sensors

Sensors are devices that can detect specific substances, energies, or states. Often they are portable and can be utilized with displays to aid a character in the field. Other times they are stationary electronics that function in a fixed area.

Sensor, Bioanalyzer: Originally developed by Shepherd, and later upgraded by Backwash and WildFire, this sensor can be interfaced with a computer. It can be used to analyze information about objects scanned in the lab, offering a +6 equipment bonus to Chemistry and Life Sciences checks made to determine the nature and condition of an object.
It can identify a creature’s current and maximum vitality points and wound points.
Thanks to the bioanalyzer’s extensive library of medical records and biological knowledge, any treatments administered using the bioanalyzer as a reference are more efficient, granting a +10 equipment bonus on all Life Sciences checks to treat injuries.
The device is a Large computer with various models and casings. It is typically mounted on the ceiling of a medical lab where it can be focused on a patient. It can be used with a HUD or similar device.
Availability: November, Year -2 (Mark I)

Sensor, Electronic Sweeper: An electronic sweeper is a tiny, hand-held device used to detect the location of electronics - particularly those that are hidden. The device grants a +4 equipment bonus to Perception checks made to locate electronics within 30'. Anything not concealed can be detected with a successful check (DC 10). The DC for concealed or less obvious threats is equal to their Stealth check result.
Availability: June, 1992

Sensor, Motion Tracker: Developed by the Hidden Kingdom’s SciTech division, this sensor is capable of not only detecting motion but also of plotting it on a display screen in relation to other objects. The motion sensor plots motion relative to its own position, but can sense motion through walls and solid surfaces, indicating the location of any moving object within 100'.
The device is a Tiny computer with various models and casings. It can be a hand-held computer or computerized gauntlet with an integrated monitor, or can be used with a HUD or similar device.
Availability: June, Year -1

Sensor, Portable Analyzer: Developed by Shepherd, this portable analyzer is a sensor with a hand scanner, LCD, and alpha-numeric pad. It can be used to analyze information about objects scanned in the field, offering a +4 equipment bonus to Chemistry, Life Sciences, and Physical Sciences checks made to determine the nature of an object.
The device is a Small computer with various models and casings. It can be a hand-held computer or computerized gauntlet with an integrated monitor, or can be used with a HUD or similar device.
Availability: November, Year -2

Surveillance & Tracking Equipment

Keeping an eye on suspects or tracking a villain, lost teammate, helpless victims, or missing artifacts can be the difference between life and death.

Audio/Video Bug: Developed by Oshi, the A/V bug transmits audio and video through an encrypted com signal. They can be detected by electronic sweeper devices, but are usually deceptively housed. Even if not, they are very small and mostly transparent, requiring a Perception check DC 25 to notice them.
Availability: October, Year -1

Black Box: This device, easily concealed in the palm of one hand, emits digital tones that convince the phone system to make a long-distance connection free of charge. They also let a user “bounce” a call through multiple switches, making the call harder to trace (the DC of any Computers check to trace the call is increased by 5).

Cellular Interceptor: About the size of a small briefcase, a cellular interceptor can detect and monitor a cell phone conversation within a 5-mile area by listening in on the cellular service’s own transmitters. Intercepting the calls of a particular cell phone requires a Computers check (DC 35); if the user knows the phone number of the phone in question, the DC drops by 10. Obviously, the phone must be in use for someone to intercept the call. A cellular interceptor cannot be used to intercept regular (ground line) phone connections.

GPS Receiver: Global positioning system receivers use signals from GPS satellites to determine the receiver’s location to within a few dozen feet. A GPS receiver grants its user a +4 equipment bonus on Navigate checks, but because the receiver must be able to pick up satellite signals, it only works outdoors.

GPS Tracking Unit: Developed by multiple sources, a GPS tracking unit is a device that uses the global positioning system to determine the precise location of a vehicle, person, or other asset to which it is attached and to record the position of the asset at regular intervals. The recorded location data can be stored within the tracking unit, or it may be transmitted to a central location data base, or internet-connected computer, using a cellular (GPRS), radio, or satellite modem embedded in the unit. This allows the asset's location to be displayed against a map backdrop either in real-time or when analyzing the track later, using customized software.

  • Data loggers: A GPS logger simply logs the position of the device at regular intervals in its internal memory. Modern GPS loggers have either a memory card slot, or internal flash memory and a USB port to act as a USB flash drive. This allows easy downloading of the data for further analysis in a computer.
  • Data pushers: This is the kind of devices used by the security industry, which pushes (i.e. "sends") the position of the device, at regular intervals, to a determined server, that can instantly analyze the data. When put on a person, or on his personal vehicle, it allows the observer not only to located them, but to know his habits.
  • Data pullers: Contrary to a data pusher, that sends the position of the device at regular intervals (push technology), these devices are always-on and allow to be queried as often as required (pull technology).

Homing Beacon: This GPS device is a data puller. Once activated, it sends a distress call to a predesignated communications device and can be easily located.

Nanobeacon: Created by Shepherd, the nanobeacon is an invaluable device used in tracking and search and rescue. It's nanobeacon is a small microchip that is placed on a target’s body (or on an object). It sends out a pulse every second that can be detected by sensors attuned to the beacon’s frequency. The nanobeacon projects its pulse at up to a 500 mile radius, each nanobeacon with its own unique identification code. Nanobeacons are often used to coordinate combat squads, track wanted criminals, and even to help recover kidnapped or lost children. A beacon can be placed on any character or object by making a simple touch attack against the target. They generally utilize the GPS Tracking Unit.
Shepherd has a nanobeacon embedded in his right leg.
Availability: July, 1992

Track Chip: Developed by the Hidden Kingdom, these devices transmit a GPS signal that can be tracked via satellite through a computer with the appropriate software. They can be detected by electronic sweeper devices, but are usually deceptively housed. Even if not, they are very small and mostly transparent, requiring a Perception check DC 25 to notice them.
Availability: March, Year -1

Lineman’s Buttset: This device resembles an oversized telephone handset with a numeric keypad on the back and wire leads hanging from the bottom. It functions as a portable, reusable telephone line tap. With an Electronics check (DC 10), a user can connect to a phone wire and hear any conversation that crosses it. A lineman’s buttset is a common tool for telephone repair personnel.

Spy Satellite: A combination of Earth observation satellite and communications satellite, these devices are used to observe locations from orbit and send information to their users. The main advantage of this satellite is that it grants an excellent vantage and is unseen. A single spy satellite can cover an area approximately 100 miles in diameter. When launched, the location of the satellite must be set (assuming a geosynchronous orbit). Once in orbit, the operator may task the satellite to any location within its range.
Some spy satellites are equipped with additional detection features, but at higher cost due to the extreme range. The capacity to utilize these technologies on satellites doesn't exist until six months after the technology is available.

Feature Cost ($)
Darkvision 600,000
Infravision +6 400,000
Armscan 400,000
Bioanalyzer 400,000,000
Bio-Scanner 4,000,000
HBS 500,000
Chemcom 400,000
Bombscan 400,000
Electricomp 400,000
Mechmouse 400,000
Medcom 320,000
Minemonkey 120,000
Motion Tracker 30,000
Portable Analyzer 160,000
Spot-Tracker 100,000

Many world governments, including the Hidden Kingdom and the Great Empire, have networks of spy satellites. Assume that these nations can task a satellite on any location in half the normal time indicated. They have a 25% chance of having a satellite with infrared available.
DoSHA has a satellite with Darkvision, Infravision +6, Bio-Scanner, Medcom, Motion Tracker, and Spot-Tracker over Seattle (Satellite One) by April, Year 3, and over New York (Satellite Two) by June, Year 3, able to cover the entirety of the United States.

Tap Detector: Plug this into a telephone line between the phone and the outlet, and it helps detect if the line is tapped. To detect a tap, make a Computers check check (the DC varies according to the type of telephone tap used; see below). With a success, the tap detector indicates that a tap is present. It does not indicate the type or location of the tap however. Also, it can’t be used to detect a lineman’s buttset.

Telephone Tap: These devices allow a character to listen to conversations over a particular phone line.

Line Tap: This tap can be attached to a phone line at any point between a phone and the nearest junction box (usually on the street nearby). Installing it requires an Electronics check (DC 15). It broadcasts all conversations on the line over a radio frequency that can be picked up by any professional walkie-talkie. Detecting a line tap by using a tap detector requires a Computers check check (DC 25).

Receiver Tap: This item can be easily slipped into a telephone handset as a Electronics check (DC 5). It broadcasts all conversations over a radio frequency that can be picked up by any professional walkie-talkie. Detecting a receiver tap by using a tap detector requires a Computers check check (DC 15).

Telephone Line Tracer: Essentially a highly specialized computer, a line tracer hooked to a phone line can trace phone calls made to that line, even if there’s a caller ID defeater hooked up at the other end. All it takes is time.
Operating a line tracer is a full-round action requiring a Computers check (DC 10). Success gains one digit of the target phone number, starting with the first number of the area code.

Miscellaneous Electronic Equipment

Caller ID Defeater: When a phone line contains a caller ID defeater, phones attempting to connect with that line show up as “anonymous” or “unavailable” on a caller ID unit. Such a call can still be traced as normal, however.

Energy Bubble Director: Developed by Tinker, this device projects energy into a sphere. Its most common use is to project force fields, but its been utilized to create personal electro-magnetic fields, matter repulsion fields, and stealth bubbles.
This is basic technology that can be implemented in many new ways.
Originally used by Tinker, the Energy Bubble Director is a small device about the size of backpack.
Availability: December, 1992

Power Backpack: The power backpack is essentially a portable generator. While worn, the power backpack can replace the power packs used by laser and plasma weapons, granting an infinite supply of ammunition while attached. Additionally, the power backpack can provide energy to almost any device requiring electrical power.

Professional Equipment

This category covers a wide variety of specialized equipment used by professionals in adventure-related fields.
Some objects contain the tools necessary to use certain skills optimally. Without the use of these items, often referred to as kits, skill checks made with these skills are at a –4 penalty if even possible. Skills and the kits they are associated with are listed below. See the descriptions of the kits for additional details. Note that kits should be restocked periodically (a cost of 20% the original cost of the kit paid once per month).
Note that some skills, by their nature, require a piece of equipment to utilize.

Bolt Cutter: An exceptionally heavy wire cutter, a bolt cutter can snip through padlocks or chain-link fences. Using a bolt cutter requires a Strength check (DC 10) and an attack action.

Chemistry Kit: A portable laboratory for use with the Chemistry skill, a chemistry kit includes the tools and components necessary for mixing and analyzing acids, bases, explosives, toxic gases, and other chemical compounds. Pharmaceutical functions of the Chemistry skill require a pharmacist kit.

Demolitions Kit: This kit contains everything needed to set detonators, wire explosive devices, and disarm explosive devices. It is used with the Electronics and Mechanics skills, but is not required for the demolitions aspects of the Architecture or Chemistry skills. Detonators must be purchased separately.

Drawing Kit: This kit contains everything needed to use the Artistry skill to create drawings in pencil and ink. It includes various lead and colored pencils, nib pens, and a bottle of ink, as well as paper in a wooden carrying case which can double as a drawing board.

Easel: This tripod stand is used to hold a painting during its creation. It can also be used to display paintings or other works of art.

Electrical Tool Kit: This collection of hand tools and small parts typically includes a variety of pliers, drivers, cutting devices, fasteners, power tools, and leads and wires.

Basic: This small kit allows a character to make Electronics checks to repair electrical or electronic devices without penalty. It isn't meant to allow you to build devices, but can be used for that, at the MI's discretion, with a -4 penalty.

Deluxe: This kit consists of a number of specialized diagnostic and repair tools as well as thousands of spare parts. It grants a +2 equipment bonus to repair electrical or electronic devices and allows a character to make Electronics checks to build devices without penalty.

Forensics Kit: Law enforcement agencies around the world use generally the same tools to gather evidence. Having an evidence kit does not grant access to a law enforcement agency’s crime lab; it merely assists in the proper gathering and storing of evidence for use by such a lab. Without an evidence kit, a character receives a –4 penalty to use the collect evidence option of the Forensics skill.

Basic: A basic evidence kit includes clean containers, labels, gloves, tweezers, swabs, and other items to gather bits of physical evidence and prevent them from becoming contaminated.

Deluxe: A deluxe kit includes all the materials in a basic kit, plus supplies for analyzing narcotic substances at the scene and for gathering more esoteric forms of physical evidence such as casts and molds of footprints or vehicle tracks, as well as chemical residues and organic fluids. It also contains the necessary dusts, sprays, brushes, adhesives, and cards to gather fingerprints. It grants a +2 equipment bonus on Forensics checks under appropriate circumstances (whenever the MI rules that the equipment in the kit can be of use in the current situation).
Using a deluxe kit to analyze a possible narcotic substance or basic chemical requires a Chemistry check (DC 15). In this case, the +2 equipment bonus does not apply.

Forgery Kit: This kit contains everything needed to use the Forgery skill to prepare forged items. Depending on the item to be forged, a character might need legal documents or other items not included in the kit.

Fusion Torch: Developed by Tinker, the fusion torch works like a super-blowtorch. The fusion torch produces a small, thin gout of flame that burns with such intensity that it creates temporary blobs of plasma all around it. The fusion torch consists of a small fuel canister attached to the torch generator. The torch deals 3d10 points of damage each round to immobile objects. Due to the nature of the fusion torch, a character using the torch must be meticulous in the way he cuts to maximize damage to whatever he is slicing through. If used as an improvised weapon, the fusion torch deals only 1d10 points of damage since it is being wielded in a more haphazard fashion.
Availability: May, 1987

Instrument: With the exceptions of singing, humming, and whistling, making music requires an instrument of some sort. In some cases a character can improvise an instrument (using the Percussions skill on a five-gallon bucket and a few empty bottles, for example). The MI may give them a -4 penalty to the skill check, or he may wave the penalty depending on the circumstance.
The list of instruments given here is finite, and players and MIs are encouraged to introduce additional musical instruments into the game world.
Unless otherwise stated, all instruments come with a vinyl case. A hard case may be purchase for an additional 20%.

Amplifier: An amplifier is a device used to make music louder so that it can be heard in a large area. Electric instruments require an amplifier to be used at all.

Electric Keyboard: This keyboard is capable of a wide variety of sounds, from a piano or organ to chimes and strings. A character uses the Keyboards skill to play this instrument. The electric keyboard comes with a stand.

Drum Set: This drum set includes a bass drum, cymbals, tom-toms, snares, and even drumsticks. It requires the Percussions skill.

Flute: This high-pitched instrument is a reedless member of the woodwind family. It requires the Wind Instruments skill to play.

French Horn: This brass instrument is coiled into a spiral and played by means of valves. Its soft sound often places it in the woodwind section of the orchestra, although it requires Brass Instruments skill to play.

Guitar, Acoustic: The acoustic guitar is very common and requires the Stringed Instrument skill. It has six strings and may be played with a pick or wit bare fingers.

Guitar, Electric: The electric guitar is the staple of rock music and requires the Stringed Instrument skill and an amplifier.

Guitar, Electric Bass: The bass guitar is common from rock to blues. It as four strings and it typically plucked or strummed with the bare fingers. It requires the Stringed Instrument skill and an amplifier.

Harp, Celtic: Small enough to play on the character's lap, it has brass strings and sounds similar to bell tones. The Celtic harp requires the Stringed Instrument skill.

Harp, Concert: The harp is an ancient instrument. Concert harps are large and usually triangular in shape. They have up to 47 nylon strings. The strings are knotted perpendicular to the soundboard. It is played by strumming or plucking, and has a somewhat celestial sound. The concert harp requires the Stringed Instrument skill.

Organ, Digital: This modern instrument is capable of several tones. While less majestic than its cousins, the digital organ is far more portable. It requires the Keyboards skill to play. It has an integrated speaker, but for large assemblies requires an amplifier. The digital organ comes with a stand.

Organ, Electric: The electric organ allowed for many organizations (particularly churches) to enjoy the musical tonality of the organ without the expense or room traditionally required (though it's still not a portable instrument). It requires the Keyboards skill and a speaker system.

Organ, Pipe: Archaic and beautiful, the pipe organ dates back to 200 AD. To generate the large volumes of air it requires, the organ was first powered by foot pedals, gravity and water. More recently organs have been powered by steam, hydraulics, gas and electricity. The essential components of the traditional organ are pipes, wind supply and wind chest, key and stop actions, and case. The many sounds of the organ are manipulated when the keyboard controlling the flow of air changes the air supply to the pipes. Organs can be very complicated ranging broadly in musical dynamics and size. They require the Keyboards skill to play.

Pan Flute: These flutes have been around for 2000 years. They are made of pottery, wood or bamboo, cut at graduated lengths and fastened together. The player blows over the end of each length of tube which corresponds to a different pitch. They require the Wind Instruments skill to play.

Piano, Baby Grand: The piano is a common keyboard instrument that dates back to the 1700s. It consists of a frame, a sound board, tuned strings, keys, and pedals. The baby grand has its strings on a horizontal harp-shaped frame. It requires the Keyboards skill to play.

Piano, Grand: This piano as strings on a horizontal harp-shaped frame, and is larger than a baby grand. It produces the highest quality of sound in the piano family. it requires the Keyboards skill to play.

Piano, Electric: This light, portable piano lacks in tonality, but its very functional. It comes with a stand and requires the Keyboards skill to play.

Piano, Upright: The upright piano is the most commonly encountered. It's tall, wide, and boxy, but only a few feet deep. It requires the Keyboards skill to play.

Recorder: A recorder is a woodwind instrument. It's end-blown and the mouth of the instrument is constricted by a plug. It has holes for seven fingers and one for the thumb of the uppermost hand. it was popular in medieval times and is common in elementary school music classes today. The recorder requires the Wind Instruments skill to play.

Trombone: This long, coiled brass instrument is played by varying its length with a U-shaped slide. It requires the Brass Instruments skill to play.

Trumpet: Modern trumpets are brass instruments played with three valves. They require the Brass Instruments skill to play.

Violin: The violin is a stringed instrument, the highest member of the violin family, played by drawing a bow over the four strings. Its sometimes called a fiddle, but the words "violin" and "fiddle" each carry a connotation for the style of music being played ("classical" or "folk"). It requires the Stringed Instruments skill to play.

Xylophone, Metal: This instrument is a series of metal bars progressing in length and tune to produce a chromatic scale with a chiming sound and lots of reverberation. It's played with small mallets and comes wit a stand. It requires the Percussions skill to play, but characters with the Keyboards skill can also play the instrument with a -4.

Xylophone, Wood: Also called a marimba, this xylophone has wooden bars tuned to produce a chromatic scale with a tonal knocking sound and little reverberation. It's played with small mallets and comes wit a stand. It requires the Percussions skill to play, but characters with the Keyboards skill can also play the instrument with a -4.

Magician's Kit: This is a set of trick items used in stage performances by magicians and illusionists. It includes a deck of marked cards, a "magic hat", a wand, trick ropes, and a variety of other items.

Basic: This kit, which fits in a small trunk or duffle bag, contains the basic items desirable for parlor magic or close-up magic. It includes items that assist a character in standard platform magician or street magician routines, such as card tricks, folding coins, cups and balls, and cut and restored rope.

Deluxe: This kit is used to help create stage illusions. It requires a large area to set up and includes equipment to assist in tricks such as the "cabinet escape", "sawing a woman in half", "Asrah levitation", "bullet catch", and "pulling a rabbit out of a hat".

Mechanical Tool Kit: This collection of hand tools and small parts typically includes a variety of pliers, drivers, cutting devices, fasteners, and even power tools.

Basic: This kit, which fits in a portable toolbox, allows a character to make Mechanics checks to repair mechanical devices without penalty. It isn't meant to allow you to build devices, but can be used for that, at the MI's discretion, with a -4 penalty.

Deluxe: This kit fills a good-sized shop cabinet. It includes a broad variety of specialized hand tools and a selection of high-quality power tools. It grants a +2 equipment bonus to Architecture and Mechanics checks made to repair devices and allows a character to make Architecture and Mechanics checks to build items and structures without penalty.

Metal Detector: This hand-held device provides a +10 equipment bonus on all Perception checks to search for metal objects.

Painting Kit, Acrylics: This kit contains everything needed to use the Artistry skill to create acrylic paintings. It includes various brushes, twenty large tubes of acrylic paints, a pallet, and clearer, as well as 4 stretched canvases. Everything but the canvases fits into a vinyl carrying case. Additional canvases stretched on frames run around $20.

Painting Kit, Oils: This kit contains everything needed to use the Artistry skill to create oil paintings. It includes various brushes, twenty large tubes of oils paints, a pallet, and clearer, as well as 4 stretched canvases. Everything but the canvases fits into a vinyl case. Additional canvases stretched on frames run around $20.

Pharmacist Kit: A portable pharmacy for use with the Pharmaceuticals application of the Chemistry skill, a pharmacist kit includes everything needed to prepare, preserve, compound, analyze, and dispense medicinal drugs.

Sculpting Kit, Clay: This kit contains everything needed to use the Artistry skill to create sculptures from clay or other soft materials. It includes various blades and other sculpting tools, as well as 10 lbs. of natural clay. Everything but the clay fits into a canvas, roll-up case. Additional clay can be purchased for $2 a pound.

Sculpting Kit, Stone: This kit contains everything needed to use the Artistry skill to create sculptures from stone or other hard materials. It includes various chisels, blades, and other sculpting tools, as well as two 5 lb. pillars of alabaster. Everything but the stone fits into a canvas, roll-up case. Additional 5 lb. pillars of alabaster can be purchased for $15 each.

Sewing Kit
This collection of tools and materials typically includes a variety of needles, thread, scissors, cord, hooks, and other implements and baubles.

Basic: This small kit allows a character to make Textiles checks to repair clothing or fabrics without penalty. It isn't meant to allow you to create new articles, but can be used for that, at the MI's discretion, with a -4 penalty.

Deluxe: This kit consists of a number of specialized tools as well as fabrics and other materials. It grants a +2 equipment bonus to repair clothing or fabrics and allows a character to make Textiles checks to create articles of clothing, upholstery, and other textiles. The fabrics included in this kit are common. More exotic materials, such as silk, velvet, second-skin, or even manticore hide can be purchased at the MI's discretion.

Sketchboard: A sketchboard is a large, flat, portable surface, usually 23.5” x 26” on which you can draw or paint.

Medical Equipment

ATP Test: Developed by the Hidden Kingdom decades ago, by taking a tissue sample, an ATP test can detect the presence and abundance of Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) in an organism. ATP plays a vital role in intracellular energy transfer. Humans have no unusual amounts of ATP within cells, but a high APT count can denote a HighBorn, wizard, werewolf, or faerie physiology.
These tests were developed and used primarily to determine whether a child with one HighBorn parent would grow to become a HighBorn as well, a spike in ATP generally occurring as much as two years prior to the manifestation of powers.
Reading an ATP test requires a Life Sciences check (DC 15). The results don't inform you of the patient's specific ontology, but do tell you how powerful he is. Creatures with energy powers are clearly identified.
Availability: 1964

Chemical, Antrad: Developed by Shepherd for Ultimas, an Antrad unit is a computerized hypodermic injector that can be used to neutralize the effects of radiation poisoning. Each Antrad unit contains a specialized analyzer linked to chemical generators. When the needle penetrates the skin of the target, it samples the target’s blood and sends the data back to the analyzer, which determines the nature of the radiation sickness and generates an antidote from stored chemical compounds. This process takes 1d4 rounds. A specially formulated synthetic cure can then be injected into the patient, who is completely cured of the radiation poisoning and its effects in 1d6 hours.
Antrad is a part of the first aid kits of some teams, including Atomic Youth, Omega Force, and the Hunt, as well as DoSHA, the Pride, and Great Empire units.
Availability: March, Year -9

Chemical, Antox: Developed by the Pride’s SciTech Division, Antox is a compound that can be used to save the life of any character infected with virtually any common poison. This miracle drug is derived from a number of plants native to western Africa. When it enters the targets bloodstream it transforms any non-living organic or inorganic matter into a thin, nontoxic liquid. The target creature continues to feel the effects of the toxin for 2d4 minutes, but does not take any further harm from it.
Antox is a part of the first aid kits of most teams, including Atomic Youth, Omega Force, the Hunt, and DoSHA, Pride, and Great Empire units.
Availability: March, 1990

Chemical, Convalescine: Developed by the Pride’s SciTech division, Convalescine is a unique chemical compound derived from a number of plants native to western Africa. It enhances the human body’s natural ability to heal. Convalescine pushes the immune system into overdrive, and can cause the character to heal from grievous wounds at a greatly increased rate. Any character injected with Convalescine heals at twice the normal rate for a 24-hour period.
In the first 24 hours, those under the effects of Convalescine also feel very energetic and can become a little stir-crazy.
Convalescine is a part of the first aid kits of some teams, including Atomic Youth, Omega Force, the Hunt, and DoSHA, Pride, and Great Empire units.
Availability: June, 1976

Chemical, Curall: Developed by the Pride’s SciTech division, Curall is a special compound that can be used to neutralize the effects of most diseases. Each curall injector contains a specialized analyzer linked to chemical generators. When the needle penetrates the skin of the target, it samples the target’s blood and sends the data back to the analyzer, which determines the nature of the disease and generates an antidote from stored chemical compounds. Once the Curall delivers its specially formulated chemicals, the target character is completely cured of the disease and its effects in 1d10 hours. Some genetically engineered diseases are created to circumvent Curall, and are unaffected by this piece of gear.
Curall is a part of the first aid kits of some teams, including Atomic Youth, Omega Force, the Hunt, and DoSHA, Pride, and Great Empire units.
Availability: July, 1984

First Aid Kit: Available at most drugstores and camping supply stores, this kit contains enough supplies (and simple instructions for their use) to treat an injury before transporting the injured person to a medical professional. A first aid kit can be used to help a dazed, unconscious, or stunned character by making a Life Science check to treat injury (DC 15). A first aid kit can be used only once. Skill checks made without a first aid kit incur a –4 penalty.

Healer's Kit: A healers kit is an assortment of natural herbs, salves, and bandages. It can be used with the Nature skill to treat a dazed, unconscious, or stunned character, to provide long-term care, to restore hit points, to treat a diseased or poisoned character, or to stabilize a dying character (see the Treat Injury application of the Nature skill).
Nature checks made to treat injuries or otherwise heal without a healer's kit incur a –4 penalty.

Med-Ex: Developed by the Pride’s SciTech division, The med-ex is a pocket-sized plexite box filled with. A treat Injury check (DC 10), as a full round action, is required to use the Med-ex, upon which it heals 1d6 Wound Points. It can also be used to add +5 to the user’s ability to stabilize a dying character. Either use expends the Med-Ex.
Availability: September, 1992

Medical Kit: About the size of a large tackle box, this is the sort of kit commonly carried by military medics and civilian EMTs. It contains a wide variety of medical supplies and equipment. A medical kit can be used to treat a dazed, unconscious, or stunned character, to provide long-term care, to restore hit points, to treat a diseased or poisoned character, or to stabilize a dying character (see the Treat Injury application of the Life Sciences skill). Skill checks made without a medical kit incur a –4 penalty.

Medkit, Advanced: Developed by the Pride, the advanced medkit functions as a combined first aid kit, medical kit, and surgery kit. It also grants its user a +2 equipment bonus on all Treat Injury checks. This item is in common use among assets of the Three Kingdoms and DoSHA, and is part of the field gear of most teams (though not individuals) as it grants greater versatility in curatives (i.e.: disease and poison) than does the Medpak or Med-Ex.
Availability: September, 1992

Medkit, Fast-Use: Developed by the Great Empire, the fast-use medkit functions as both a first aid kit and a medical kit. In addition, specialized computers and sensors prepare exactly what is needed to restore a character’s hit points, treat a disease, stabilize a dying character, or revive a dazed, stunned, or unconscious character. A character may use the Treat Injury skill with the fast-use medkit as a move action.
The fast-use medkit cannot be used as a surgery kit.
Fast-Use Medkits are in use by the Horde, many mercenaries, as well as less vital assets of the Three Kingdoms and DoSHA.
Availability: April, 1996

Medpak: Developed by the Great Empire’s SciTech division, the medpak is a one time use item used to heal minor wounds. With a Treat Injury check (DC 10) it cures 2d6 Vitality Points plus a bonus equal to the healer's Life Sciences skill ranks. It can be used to heal 1d4 points of ability damage (DC 15). It also grants a +5 equipment bonus to revive Dazed, Stunned, or Unconscious characters. Any single use of the Medpak expends it. It can be used as a move action.
Availability: July, 1989

Stabilizer: Developed by the Pride's SciTech division, stabilizer is a chemical coagulant that's injected into a dying recipient’s bloodstream to prevent excess blood loss, effectively stabilizing him. A stabilizer is usually installed near the recipient’s heart. If reduced to negative wound points, the recipient automatically stabilizes.
Availability: November, Year -1

Surgery Kit: About the size of a small backpack, this kit contains the instruments needed for rudimentary emergency field surgery. A surgery kit is used when performing surgery (see the Treat Injury application of the Life Sciences skill). A character performing surgery without a surgery kit takes a -4 penalty on these checks. (This penalty is in addition to the -4 penalty that applies if the character does not have the Surgery feat.)

Non-Medical Drugs

Non-medical drugs are used for many reasons by many people. They may grant enhancements, advantages, or help bring situations under control. Few unprescribed drugs, however, are without side-effects.

Chemical, Boost: Originally developed by government scientists for use by the Soviet Red Army, the recipe for Boost was sold on the black market after the fall of the Soviet Union. Its rarely been in use by organized crime syndicates and terrorist organizations in Europe and the Middle East in the years since, as the drug is beneficial, but highly dangerous. Boost functions as a temporary adrenaline-enhancer. A single injection of boost grants the character a +4 bonus to Strength and a +2 bonus on Reflex saves, increases the character’s movement speed by 10', and increases the character’s massive damage threshold by +4. After 1 hour all benefits gained are halved. After 2 hours all benefits are lost.
Unfortunately, the side effects of boost almost outweigh the benefits. For one, the chemical is addictive and can alter the perceptions of a character so that she thinks she cannot live without a dose of the drug. Additionally, repeated use of boost has debilitating effects on the body’s immune and nervous systems.
Each time a character uses a dose of boost, she has a 10% chance of suffering a -2 penalty to her Dexterity and a -1 penalty on Fortitude saves. These penalties last for 24 hours.
If the character uses the drug again before recovering from these penalties, the penalties increase and the recovery time extends for an additional 24 hours. For example, if a character uses another dose of boost while still under the effect of the penalties, the character suffers a -4 penalty to Dexterity and -2 on Fortitude saves, and the recovery time increases to 48 hours.
In addition to some use by organized crime syndicates and terrorist organizations in Europe and the Middle East, boost has come to the United States in the form of a street drug. Most world government agencies have studied it in order to find a way to minimalize its dangerous side-affects.
Availability: June, 1984

Chemical, Chloraline: Developed by Oshi, chloraline is powerful, reliable, and fast-acting sedative. It may have some mild side-effects (nausea) but and risk of overdose is virtually nil.
The statistics for chloraline may vary depending on dosage (see individual entries under Shadow-tech: Weapons)
Chloraline typically requires a Fort save (DC 18). If the target successfully saves, he becomes fatigued. If he fails he falls unconscious the following round. He may make a new Fort save after 45 minutes to regain consciousness, and every 10 minutes thereafter. These saves are made with a successive -1 to the DC. Upon regaining consciousness, the target must make another Fort save (DC 10). Failure indicates the character is nauseated for 1d4 x 10 minutes. Drinking water clears this condition in 1d4 minutes.
In its infancy, chloraline is used almost exclusively in the espionage community. Eventually it has more widespread use, but its cost remains a deterrent.
Availability: April, 1992

Chemical, Psibond: Developed by Dr. Black, Psibond is actually two separate chemical compounds. Compound A is injected into a person whose mind is to be read, compound B into one who wishes to read their mind. It allows the reader telepathic abilities for 2d4 minutes, but only in regards to the single subject of compound A. They gain the Telepathy power at power level 8. The drugs can boost the power level of someone with telepathic abilities by +8 power levels.
Psibond compound B is dangerous and highly addictive. the chemical can alter the perceptions of a character so that he thinks she cannot live without a dose of the drug. Additionally, repeated use of Psibond has debilitating effects on the mind.
Each time a character uses a dose of Psibond compound B, he has a 10% chance of suffering a -2 penalty to her Intelligence Dexterity and a -1 penalty on Will saves. These penalties last for 24 hours.
If the character uses the drug again before recovering from these penalties, the penalties increase and the recovery time extends for an additional 24 hours. For example, if a character uses another dose of boost while still under the effect of the penalties, the character suffers a -4 penalty to Intelligence and -2 on Will saves, and the recovery time increases to 48 hours.
Availability: August, Year -5

Chemical, Truthtell: Developed nearly a century ago by Kirabo, a brilliant Doctor among the Pride, Sande Amazzi or "Sunday Water" is a specially formulated chemical that targets the areas of the brain that handle creativity and, particularly, lying. By temporarily neutralizing these areas of the brain, the chemical now commonly known as truthtell makes it impossible for a character to lie while under the drug’s influence.
A character imbibing truthtell may make a Will save (DC 20) to negate its effects. On a failed save, the character is compelled to speak truthfully for the next 3d10 minutes. A subject under the effect of truthtell is aware of its influence and may still refuse to answer questions.
Availability: August, 1911

Wolf's Balm: This ancient brew, which includes wolf's bane, allows a wild werewolf to maintain their humanity. This is just as effective for a natural werewolf and one made from wolf's bane. It is usually necessary only on the night of the full moon and the night before and after.

Wolf's Bane: Aconitum (also known as aconite or monkshood) is a flowering plant belonging to the buttercup family. While toxic, in specific doses it has the ability to turn HighBorn and others with the Blood of the Ancients (including kindred humans) into werewolves. This is a wild transformation, leaving little in the way of the character's humanity. Without the cure (wolf's wane), the new werewolf continues to transform under the full moon, as well as the night prior and following. These transformations last for three months. On the final transformation, they become a wild and dangerous wolf permanently.

Wolf's Wane: Wolf's wane is an ancient cure for induced lycanthropy, such as Lycanthropic Affliction. It also temporarily suppresses natural lycanthropy.

Containers

With the wide variety of equipment available to modern adventurers, it’s often critical to have something to store the equipment in or carry it around in.

Aluminum Travel Case: A travel case is a reinforced metal box with foam inserts. Wing-style clamps keep it from opening accidentally. Aluminum travel cases come in several sizes.

Backpack, Adventuring: This is a large backpack, typically used by campers, scouts and soldiers. It has one or two central sections, as well as several exterior pockets and straps for attaching tents, sleeping bags, or other gear. It can carry up to 60 pounds of gear. While not submersible, its made of tough water-resistant material and is waterproof. It fits comfortably over both shoulders. This backpack gives a character a +1 equipment bonus to Strength for the purpose of determining carrying capacity.

Backpack, Student: This is a small backpack, the sort often used by students to carry their books around, or by outdoor enthusiasts on short hikes. It holds 10 pounds of gear and fits comfortably over one or both shoulders.

Briefcase: A briefcase can carry up to 5 pounds worth of gear. A briefcase can be locked, but its cheap lock is not very secure (Mechanics DC 20; break DC 10). Briefcases can be hard or soft, and made of any material from nylon to leather.

Computer Case: Similar to a briefcase, a computer case can carry up to 6 pounds worth of gear. It holds a laptop or notebook computer snugly and has internal pockets designed to hold accessories. A standard computer case doesn't have a lock. A computer case with a lock cost an extra $20. Its a cheap lock, and is not very secure (Mechanics DC 20; break DC 10).

Contractor’s Field Bag: A combination tool bag and notebook computer case, this has pockets for tools, pens, notepads, and cell phones. It even has a clear plastic flap for maps or plans. Made of durable fabric, it holds 10 pounds worth of equipment and comes with a shoulder strap.

Duffel Bag: A duffel bag or "gym bag" is a large, cylindrical bag made of sturdy cloth with the closure at the top and a shoulder-strap. A duffel bag can typically hold 12 pounds of equipment.

Handbag: Handbags provide another way to carry 2 pounds of equipment. The cost shown is for a basic bag; high-fashion purses can increase the cost by up to 200%.

Patrol Box: Originally developed for use by police officers, this portable file cabinet has found favor with traveling salespeople. This hard-sided briefcase takes up the passenger seat of an automobile and provides easy access to files, storage for a laptop computer, and a writing surface. It holds 5 pounds worth of equipment and has an average lock (Mechanics DC 25; break DC 15).

Plexite Travel Case: Plexite is a light-weight polymer with a tensile strength similar to steel. A plexite travel case is otherwise similar to one made from aluminum.

Range Pack: This lightweight black bag has a spacious inner compartment capable of holding roughly 8 pounds of gear and can hold an additional 4 pounds in six zippered external compartments. The larger version holds 12 pounds of equipment in the internal compartment and another 6 pounds in the zippered external pouches. A range pack easily holds several pistols and a submachine gun, and the larger version can hold disassembled rifles.

Security Equipment

Keeping foes out of an area can be vital to the success of a mission, especially when that area is your home base. Many items can be used to enhance security.

Force-Field Generator: Developed by Tinker, the force-field generator is a 9' tall cylinder on a round base that projects a protective sphere. A force-field is considered cover. It has a hardness of 15 and 25 hit points. Additionally it has a Break DC of 20. It can be revitalized as a move action, restoring any lost hardness or hit points. Until it is broken, those within the bubble cannot be damaged by incoming attacks. If it is broken they receive no protection until it is restored by a new move action. If it was broken by damage dealing hit points, the damage beyond what it took to break through is dealt to the appropriate target(s) within. the excess damage is also compared to a Break DC 20. If the Break DC is exceeded, the force-field generator must be repaired before it can be used again.
Like any full cover, you cannot attack anything outside the force field from within. However, you may lower your Force Field as a move action (but you then have no protection until you raise it with a new move action).
Teleportation is blocked by force-fields just as an attack. However, a teleporter attempting to teleport inside a closed force field (one providing cover in all directions) rolls a power check against the force-fields Break DC (as if their Power Level were a Strength bonus).
If the teleporter succeeds, they and anyone teleporting with her make it inside the force-field, but must make Fortitude saves (DC 20). Those who fail materialize inside the area of the force-field, but are unconscious for 1d4+1 rounds. Those who succeed are dazed for one round.
If the teleporter fails the results are similar, but the teleporter and any with her are thrown back from the force-field. They land on the ground on the side they were teleporting from. The teleporter is 1d3 x 5' from the force-field, and those with her are 1d3-1 x 5' from her in the direction they were standing when they originally teleported (results of 0' may mean they are on top of each other). All those teleporting make Fort saves to determine whether they’re dazed or unconscious, just as if they’d broken through. If they’re conscious, they may also make a Reflex save DC 15 (+2 synergy bonus for 5 or more ranks in Tumble) to land in their feet.
Availability: December, 1995

Force-Field Reinforcement: Based on Tinker’s force-field generator, and developed by the Hidden Kingdom, force-field reinforcement allows the hull of a structure or vehicle to be strengthened with an internal force-field. This adds +15 to the hardness, +25 to the hull points, and +10 to the break DC of the structure. It also grants protection from teleportation equal to the strength of the force-field.
The mechanism by which it works is a fiber-optic grid system which is woven within the structures outer wall or hull.
Force-field reinforcement has a base cost of $12,000. plus $4,000 per floor beyond the first. Reinforcing interior walls and floors can be very cost prohibitive. Fully integrating a single room into the system costs an additional $2,000. A room on its own grid, however, costs the standard $12,000.
Vehicles can utilize this technology as well. Vehicles up to Gargantuan size can be covered for $12,000. Colossal vehicles cost $24,000, Behemoth cost $36,000, Titanic cost $48,000, Ginormous cost $60,000, and Astronomical cost $72,000.
Availability: February, Year -1

Clothing

The items described here represent special clothing types, or unusual outfits that a character might need to purchase.
For the most part, clothing choice is based on character concept and life-style. Every hero has a number of outfits determined by his Budget Option. Sometimes a character might need something out of the ordinary. When that’s the case, he'll have to purchase it like any other piece of gear. Clothes can have several effects on game mechanics:

  • Disguise: Clothing is often part of a disguise and is used to create a costume to protect a hero's identity. See the Bluff skill description for more on how appropriate dress affects disguise attempts. See the entry on Reputation to see how costumes effect secret identities, as well as the Costume section below.
  • Concealment: Clothes also help to hide firearms, body armor, and small objects. Tightly tailored clothing imposes a penalty on an attempt to conceal an object; clothing purposely tailored to conceal objects provides a bonus.
  • Influence: The right outfit can give you a bonus to Charisma-based or Appearance-based skill checks in some circumstances. See the entry on various outfits below for more details.

Costume: Heroes and villains are often recognized by their costumes or uniforms. Some characters have a costume that's not much more than stylized, signature clothing. Others require costumes made of special materials such as second-skin.

Light: This is a skimpy costume. It does little to hide the character's physiology. It doesn't cover ore than a t-shirt and underwear. It grants only a +1 circumstance bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's mask and any other bonus to Bluff.

Medium: This costume shows some skin, and doesn't hide the character's physiology particularly well. In addition to the parts of the body covered by the light costume, it covers either the characters arms or legs fully. It grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's mask and any other bonus to Bluff.

Heavy: This form-fitting, neck-to-toe costume grants a +3 circumstance bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's mask and any other bonus to Bluff.

Full: This bulky, neck-to-toe costume conceals features and physiology. It grants a +4 circumstance bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's mask and any other bonus to Bluff.

Second-Skin: Developed by the Hidden Kingdom decades ago, second-skin is a material capable of borrowing the immunities and emulating the abilities of it’s wearer. It is most often used to create durable clothing needed for adventuring by HighBorn. For example, a second-skin suit worn by a fire-generating character would not burn. One worn by a shape-shifter would shift to fit in any form. When worn by someone with the ability to grow, the material grows as well.
Second-skin is expensive, costing 400% the base cost of the costume.
Accessories, such a cellphones, armor, and weapons, do not gain the properties of the second-skin.

Mask: Masks are an important part of a costume when a character doesn't want to be recognized.

Light: A light mask is little more than a line around the character's eyes. It doesn't do a lot to hide his identity, but does mark him as "super". Many goggles fall into this category. Light masks grant +1 equipment bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's costume and any other bonus to Bluff.

Medium: Medium masks are heavier around the eyes than light masks. Alternately they might cover the lower half of the character's face (showing only the eyes and above). Tinted goggles fall into this category. They grant +2 equipment bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's costume and any other bonus to Bluff.

Heavy: A heavy mask covers the upper half of the character's face. Only those who are friends (see Familiarity) of the character have any chance of recognizing him. They grant +4 equipment bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's costume and any other bonus to Bluff.

Full: A full mask covers the character's face completely, including his eyes. Only those who are close friends (see Familiarity) of the character have any chance of recognizing him. They grant +6 equipment bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's costume and any other bonus to Bluff.

Second-Skin: Heroes and villains are recognized by their costume. Some characters have a costume that's not much more than stylized, signature clothing. Others require costumes made of special materials such as second-skin. Second-skin is able to replicate the properties of its wearer, becoming fire-proof when worn by a fiery heroine, or transforming into electricity for a hero who does the same. Second-skin is expensive, costing an additional 400% the base cost of the costume.

Outfit: An outfit of clothing represents everything a character needs to dress a part: pants or skirt, shirt, undergarments, appropriate shoes or boots, socks or stockings, and any necessary belt or suspenders. The clothes a character wears does not count against the weight limit for encumbrance.

Business: A business outfit generally includes a jacket or blazer, and it tends to look sharp and well groomed without being overly formal. Mastercraft business outfits are available. At $400, the business outfit grants a +1 to Bluff, Diplomacy, and Intimidate in appropriate, "business" situations (including board room meetings and political speeches). At $800 the bonus is +2 to the same skills. The bonus increases to +3 for $1600, +4 for $3200, and +5 for $6400. Shabby or inappropriate clothing can hinder you with a penalty from -1 to -5 at the MI's discretion.

Casual: Casual clothes range from cut-off jeans and a T-shirt to neatly pressed khakis and a hand-knit sweater. Casual clothes that are priced higher than the basic cost are "designer" clothes". At $140, the casual outfit grants a +1 to Bluff, Diplomacy, and Intimidate in casual situations (including hanging out at school or the park). At $280 the bonus is +2 to the same skills. The bonus increases to +3 for $560, +4 for $1120, and +5 for $2240. Shabby or inappropriate clothing can hinder you with a penalty from -1 to -5 at the MI's discretion.

Formal: From a little black dress to a fully appointed tuxedo, formal clothes are appropriate for “black tie” occasions. Special designer creations can have cost much higher than shown on the table. At $1000, the formal outfit grants a +1 to Bluff, Diplomacy, and Intimidate in formal situations (including prom and the governor's ball). At $2000 the bonus is +2 to the same skills. The bonus increases to +3 for $4000, +4 for $8000, and +5 for $16,000. Shabby or inappropriate clothing can hinder you with a penalty from -1 to -5 at the MI's discretion.

Explorer: The explorer’s outfit is the standard uniform for bold adventurers taking their first steps into the unknown. It includes a set of cargo pants and a utility vest, each covered in numerous pockets and pouches for holding miscellaneous gear. Additionally, the explorer outfit features a pair of durable all-weather boots with a built-in knife sheath, as well as a neck-shading cap, a pair of utility sunglasses, and a belt that holds pouches of all kinds. The chief premise of the explorer’s outfit is versatility, giving the explorer a basic set of clothing that can be added to and augmented for each particular mission.

Fatigues: Called “battle dress uniforms” or "basic dress uniforms" (BDUs) in the military, these are worn by hardened veterans and wannabes alike. They’re rugged, comfortable, and provide lots of pockets. They are also printed in camouflage patterns: woodland, desert, winter (primarily white), urban (gray patterned), and black are available. When worn in an appropriate setting, fatigues grant a +2 bonus on Hide checks.

Uniform: From the guy behind the counter at the local fast-food place to a senior Air Force officer, some jobs require uniforms—making such clothing an essential part of some disguises, since a uniform inclines people to trust the wearer.

Outerwear: In addition to keeping a character warm and dry, coats and jackets provide additional concealment for things a character is carrying (they often qualify as loose or bulky clothing; see Concealed Weapons and Objects).

Coat: An outer garment worn on the upper body. Its length and style vary according to fashion and use.

Fatigue Jacket: A lightweight outer garment fashioned after the fatigue uniforms worn by military personnel when performing their standard duties.

Ghillie Suit: The ultimate in camouflage, a ghillie suit is a loose mesh overgarment covered in strips of burlap in woodland colors, to which other camouflaging elements can easily be added. A figure under a ghillie suit is nearly impossible to discern.
A character wearing a ghillie suit with appropriate coloration gains a +10 bonus on Stealth checks to hide. The suit’s coloration can be changed with a move action. However, the bulky suit imposes a penalty of –4 on all Dexterity checks, Dexterity-based skill checks (except to hide), and melee attack rolls.

Overcoat: A warm coat worn over a suit jacket or indoor clothing.

Parka: This winter coat grants the wearer a +2 equipment bonus on Fortitude saves made to resist the effects of cold weather.

Photojournalist’s Vest: Made of cotton with mesh panels to keep the wearer cool, the photojournalist’s vest has numerous obvious—and hidden—pockets. It counts as loose and bulky clothing when used to conceal Small or smaller weapons, and also grants the “specially modified to conceal object” bonus when used to conceal Tiny or smaller objects. (See Concealed Weapons and Objects.)

Rain Poncho: This is a hooded covering made of vinyl or plastic and worn to protect the character and their clothing and gear from the rain.

Space-suit: A space-suit is a complex system of garments, gear, and environmental systems designed to keep a person alive and comfortable in the harsh environment of outer space. It provides stable internal pressure, mobility, circulation of cooled and purified oxygen, temperature regulation, ultraviolet radiation shielding, limited particle radiation shielding, protection against micrometeoroids, and a communication system. the suit also provides means to recharge and discharge gases and liquids, to maneuver, dock, release, and/or tether onto spacecraft, and of collecting and containing solid and liquid waste.

Windbreaker: This is a lightweight jacket made of wind-resistant material.

Accessories: Accessories are items worn that aren't actual clothing, but can add to the look or utility of an outfit or costume.

Glasses: Thick-framed glasses can be a great help to securing a secret identity. They grant a +2 circumstance bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. The character might wear these glasses in her mundane identity or her "super" identity and gain the same bonus. Prescription glasses cost $100 + $100 per -1 to Perception to correct.

Hood: A hood is anything that covers a character's hair. It grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's costume and any other bonus to Bluff. A second-skin hood costs $80.

Sunglasses: Dark-lensed glasses can help you keep your secret identity. They grant a +3 circumstance bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. The character might wear these glasses in her mundane identity or her "super" identity and gain the same bonus. Prescription sunglasses cost $150 + $100 per -1 to Perception to correct.

Tool Belt: This sturdy leather belt has numerous pockets and loops for tools, nails, pencils, and other necessities for repair and construction work, making it easy to keep about 10 pounds of items on hand. The pockets are open, however, and items can easily fall out if the belt is tipped.

Utility Belt: Very useful in the field, a utility belt carries small items you might need in a pinch. A standard utility belt comes with two pouches, each capable of holding 1 pound. it can also be fitted with additional pouches, sheaths, or similar containers. Most teams and organizations who utilize utility belts have basic options available to members.
The MI is free to allow members of any team-member to have a utility belt at no cost, so long as that team is listed in his allegiances. Team utility belts cannot contain more than $500 worth of items.

  • Atomic Youth: Atomicom with ear-clip & charger, pouch, penlight, magnesium fire starter, flare rod (4), flare canister (3), rain poncho, magnetic compass, chemical light sticks, multi-purpose tool, pocket knife, med-pac (3), med-ex (1).
  • Omega Force: Badgecom, com-bead, pouch, Griffon .45, penlight, laser fire-starter, rain poncho, homing beacon, gps receiver, chemical light sticks, multi-purpose tool, utility knife, med-pac (3), med-ex (1).
  • DoSHA: HUDcom, com-bead, pouch, Griffon .45, penlight, laser fire-starter, rain poncho, homing beacon, chemical light sticks, multi-purpose tool, utility knife, med-pac (3), med-ex (1).

Wig: Much like a hood, a wig disguises the character's hair. It grants a +3 circumstance bonus to Bluff checks not to be recognized. This bonus stacks with the character's costume and any other bonus to Bluff. The character might wear the wig in her mundane identity or her "super" identity and gain the same bonus.

Weapon Accessories

As if modern weapons weren’t dangerous enough, a number of accessories can increase their utility or efficiency.

Box Magazine: For weapons that use box magazines, a character can purchase extras. Loading these extra magazines ahead of time and keeping them in a handy place makes it easy to reload a weapon in combat.

Detonator: A detonator activates an explosive, causing it to explode. The device consists of an electrically activated blasting cap and some sort of device that delivers the electrical charge to set off the blasting cap. Connecting a detonator to an explosive requires an Electronics check (DC 15). Failure means that the explosive fails to go off as planned. Failure by 10 or more means the explosive goes off as the detonator is being installed.

Blasting Cap: This is a detonator without a built-in controller. It can be wired into any electrical device, such as a light switch or a car’s ignition switch, with an Electronics check (DC 10). When the electrical device is activated, the detonator goes off.

Radio Control: This device consists of two parts: the detonator itself and the activation device. The activation device is an electronic item about the size of a deck of cards, with an antenna, a safety, and an activation switch. When the switch is toggled, the activation device sends a signal to the detonator by radio, setting it off. It has a range of 500 feet.

Timed: This is an electronic timer connected to the detonator. Like an alarm clock, it can be set to go off at a particular time.

Wired: This is the simplest form of detonator. The blasting cap connects by a wire to an activation device, usually a small pistol-grip device that the user squeezes. The detonator comes with 100 feet of wire, but longer lengths can be spliced in with an Electronics check (DC 10).

Holster: Holsters are generally available for all Medium-size or smaller firearms.

Hip: This holster holds the weapon in an easily accessed—and easily seen—location.

Concealed Carry: A concealed carry holster is designed to help keep a weapon out of sight (see Concealed Weapons and Objects). In most cases, this is a shoulder holster (the weapon fits under the wearer’s armpit, presumably beneath a jacket). Small or Tiny weapons can be carried in waistband holsters (often placed inside the wearer’s waistband against his or her back). Tiny weapons can also be carried in ankle or boot holsters.

Illuminator: An illuminator is a small flashlight that mounts to a firearm, freeing up one of the user’s hands. It functions as a standard flashlight.

Laser Sight: This small laser mounts on a firearm, and projects a tiny red dot on the weapon’s target. A laser sight grants a +1 equipment bonus on all attack rolls made against targets no farther than 30' away. However, a laser sight can’t be used outdoors during the daytime.

Scope: A scope is a sighting device that makes it easier to hit targets at long range. However, although a scope magnifies the image of the target, it has a very limited field of view, making it difficult to use.

Standard: A standard scope increases the range increment for a ranged weapon by one-half (multiply by 1.5). However, to use a scope a character must spend an attack action acquiring his or her target. If the character changes targets or otherwise lose sight of the target, she must reacquire the target to gain the benefit of the scope.

Electro-Optical: An electro-optical scope functions the same as a standard scope in normal light. In darkness, however, the user sees through it as if she had the darkvision ability granted by night vision goggles (120' range).

Speed Loader: A speed loader holds a number of bullets in a ring, in a position that mirrors the chambers in a revolver cylinder. Using a speed loader saves time in reloading a revolver, since a character can insert all the bullets at once.

Suppressor: A suppressor fits on the end of a firearm, capturing the gases traveling at supersonic speed that propel a bullet as it is fired. This eliminates the noise from the bullet’s firing, dramatically reducing the sound the weapon makes when it is used. For handguns, the only sound is the mechanical action of the weapon (Perception check, DC 15, to notice). For longarms, the supersonic speed of the bullet itself still makes noise. However, it’s difficult to tell where the sound is coming from, requiring a Perception check (DC 15) to locate the source of the gunfire.
Modifying a weapon to accept a suppressor requires a Mechanics check (DC 15). Once a weapon has been modified in this manner, a suppressor can be attached or removed as a move action.
Suppressors cannot be used on revolvers or shotguns. A suppressor purchased for one weapon can be used for any other weapon that fires the same caliber of ammunition.



The Gadget System

The gadget system is a way to customize weapons, armor, and equipment to more appropriately fit a given campaign or character. The gadget system allows a degree of freedom in designing specific models of equipment from the basic items found throughout this chapter.
Using the gadget system is a simple matter of mixing and matching various elements of a piece of gear until it fits what is needed.
First, pick a basic weapon, armor, or piece of equipment to be modified. Select a gadget for the appropriate type (armor gadgets for armor, and so on). Modify the cost of the basic item according to the gadget’s instructions, and then purchase the gadget-modified item as normal. Some gadgets have additional restrictions placed on them that must be considered before making the gadget modification.


Equipment Gadgets

The following gadgets can apply to any equipment provided all gadget-specific restrictions are observed.

Compact: By eliminating wasted space and using smaller components, some engineers are capable of producing equipment far smaller than its standard counterparts. Any piece of equipment that makes use of the compact gadget is one size smaller than normal. The item cannt be reduced to smaller that one size category with this gadget.
This type of technology is most commonly produced in the Great Empire.
Restrictions: None.
Cost: +80%.

HUD Software, Sensor-Link: Developed by the Ettore, the sensor link software allows the user to directly link any computer sensor to the HUD. As a result, any sensor can be used hands-free as a free action, provided they are present on the character’s person.
Restrictions: HUD only.
Cost: $200.

LCD Surface: Developed by the Great Empire’s SciTech division, one of the most revolutionary advances in computer technology is the LCD surface gadget. This allows almost any surface to be used as a computer display, as it grafts the color-changing pixels common to all display devices onto another surface.
Any piece of equipment with the LCD surface gadget can be used as a display for any piece of computer or communications equipment. Additionally, weapons and armor may make use of the LCD Surface gadget at the normal cost, but gain no special benefit from the modification other than being able to display data.
Restrictions: None.
Cost: +200%.

Miniaturized: By eliminating wasted space and using microscopic components, some engineers are capable of producing equipment vastly smaller than normal. Any weapon that makes use of the miniaturized gadget is two size categories smaller than normal, to a minimum size of Diminutive.
This type of technology is most commonly produced in the Great Empire.
Restrictions: None.
Cost: +250%.

Multi-Use Item: Similar in function to the alternate weapon gadget, the multiple use item gadget allows the character to integrate the function of two separate items into a single device.
When selecting the multiple use item gadget, choose a second object. That object is integrated into the base object and can be used at any time. Additionally, you must choose whether or not the alternate object may be physically separated from the base weapon or not at the time of purchase. This gadget may be selected multiple times, each time adding a single additional piece of equipment to the base object.
Special: The size of the integrated item is typicaly the same as the largest basic item. If more than two items are integrated, and the size of these additional items is within one size category of the basic item, the size of the multi-use item is one category larger.
Restrictions: The character must also purchase the piece of equipment to be integrated separately from the armor, before the gadget modification is made.
Cost: The cost of all integrated items, +10%.

Satellite Datalink: The value of knowledge and accurate intelligence is a crucial aspect of military operations, and the ability to connect to a global communications network is critical to the success of any team. Intelligence can travel at the speed of light across the globe to command centers safe behind defended battle lines or in a secret head quarters on the other side of the world. The satellite datalink gadget enables any piece of equipment (computer, com, HUD, etc.) to connect to a global satellite network and communicate with computer systems in far remote areas.
The satellite datalink doesn't rely on relay towers (like a cellphone), only on a network of private satellites.
Many of the communications devices (such as coms) already include this gadget.
Restrictions: This gadget may only be used with gear containing computerized communications equipment.
Cost: +50%.

Storage Compartment
Like the gadget used for armor, the ability to store and carry small items in a safe place can sometimes be of critical importance. The storage compartment gadget accomplishes just that, incorporating an empty space where other objects can be carried with relative ease. Each storage compartment gadget allows the wearer to carry two items of size Small or smaller in a container built into the piece of equipment. This gadget may be taken multiple times, each time providing another compartment where small items may be carried.
Restrictions: None.
Cost: +10%.



Shadow-Tech

Shadow-tech is the term commonly used within the Penumbra for devices that utilize technology not available to the world at large. Much of this tech has been protected and kept secret by HighBorn and others so as not to threaten the Veil.
No discussion of shadow-tech would be complete without a look at some of those responsible for its integration into Penumbrite society.

Centaur Corp: A division of Dread Enterprises, the Centaur Corporation works in fields of human enhancement. The Founder, Derrick Dread, was obsessed with the secrets of the Penumbra, particularly in the field of technological, medical, and mystical biological augmentation. He was driven by a desire to save his son, Jarred. Through there subsidiaries, they are responsible many advances. Chimera BioTech has developed advanced genetic engineering and gene therapy. Phoenix CyberWare deals with cybernetics.
Dread Enterprises is now run by C.E.O. Json Dread, who, until recently had no knowledge of the Penumbra or his father’s secret work.

Dr. Zahid: Dr. Laslo Zahid is a scientist from twenty years in the future who studied the Chronomatrix and came with Deathrage to the current time. After the Marshals and Atomic Youth devistated Deathrages Mercer Island headquarters, Zahid became a free agent. He begain to sell weaponry and other equipment that the Azurite Elite had brought with them from the future.

Dwarfcraft: Dwarves have been making weapons and armor for centuries.

GnomeTech: Gnomes have been creating technology for centuries. From communications to fusion, gnomes have led the way in technological advances.

Great Empire SciTech Division: The Science and Technologies Division of the Great Empire, the HighBorn kingdom of Asia, excels at miniaturization and mass production. Oshi spend years prior to the Last War as there chief technician.

Hidden Kingdom SciTech Division: The Science and Technologies Division of the Hidden Kingdom, the HighBorn kingdom of West, has developed a great deal of technology, particularly in the interest of secret ops and warfare. Tinker was among their most recent tech experts.

Oshi: A brilliant tech-savant, Oshi spent his younger years working for the Great Empire. For reason’s untold, he fled the Great Empire and now works exclusively for the mysterious spy, Dramon. Most of his inventions are electronics - the focus of his super-intelligence.

Pride SciTech Division: The Science and Technologies Division of the Pride, the HighBorn kingdom in Africa, deals mostly in advanced biological and chemical sciences. Many curatives now in use within the Penumbra were designed by them.

Shepherd: Son of the prior High Teacher, Joseph Shepherd used his Radial Sense abilities to understand the inner workings of alien technology and other Shadow-Tech while working for Ultimas prior to and during the Last War. Now trying to make amends for his past sins, Shepherd uses his knowledge and technical skills on behalf of Atomic Youth and its allies. Shepherd is a computer specialist and cyber-surgeon among other disciplines.

Tinker: Tinker was a tech-savant and member of Atomic League in the decade prior to the Last War. He was killed during the Last War, but much of his technology was developed for the Hidden Kingdom and had wide-spread use before the Dark Days.

Ultimas: The ancient evil who’s name is still whispered, Ultimas was always armed with advanced technology. Much of it was based on relics from the downed Nythasian Carrier in ancient Akkadia, but other items were discovered or developed through the ages. During the decade prior to the Last War, much of his scientific exploits delved into genetic engineering.



Equipment List

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